Local Plan 2016-2036 Part One: Planning Strategy New Forest District outside the New Forest National Park

On 6 July 2020 the Local Plan 2016-2036 Part 1: Planning Strategy for New Forest District (outside of the New Forest National Park) was formally adopted at a virtual public meeting of the full Council.

You can view a web version of the text here or download the document below.

Icon for pdf Local Plan 2016-2036 Part 1: Planning Strategy Document [9.18MB]

Table of Contents

Foreword

The adoption of the Local Plan 2016 2036 Part One: Planning Strategy as the statutory basis for planning decisions brings the development plan up to date with the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF).

At the heart of the new Local Plan is a step change in housing delivery to meet both local needs and national policy objectives. The change from the previous policy emphasis on development restraint has presented significant challenges to the communities that live in the area, and to the Council in terms of the limited availability of land appropriate for development.

All new residential development within the Plan Area will have an impact on International Nature Conservation sites, whose conservation and protection is of international importance. Residential development (and other forms of development) within the

Plan Area can only be made compliant with the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 if it is accompanied by an extensive package of habitat mitigation measures.

The Government has fully endorsed the Council's balanced vision and strategy for the future of this area. The planning strategy ensures the long-term protection of internationally significant environmental sites, the Green Belt, and the landscape and townscape character of the area whilst providing the right amount and mix of new homes, affordable homes, jobs and facilities that our communities and businesses need.

Councillor Edward Heron - Planning and Infrastructure Portfolio Holder Deputy Leader of the Council

1 Introduction

About the Local Plan

1.1 The Local Plan sets out a strategy and policies for the use, development or protection of land and buildings in the Plan Area for the period 2016 to 2036. The Plan Area is those parts of New Forest District outside the New Forest National Park (as shown in Figure 2.1).

1.2 The Local Plan forms part of the statutory development plan for the Plan Area (together with any Neighbourhood Plans and the Hampshire Minerals and Waste Plan). The policies of the statutory development plan are the basis for deciding planning applications for development.

Two stage Local Plan Review

1.3 This Local Plan 2016-2036 Part One: Planning Strategy sets out strategic policies, including Strategic Site Allocations capable of accommodating 100 or more homes. It replaces and updates parts of the adopted Core Strategy (2009), and a small number of the more strategic policies in the Local Plan Part 2: Sites and Development Management adopted in 2014.

1.4 The remaining policies of the adopted Core Strategy (2009) and Local Plan Part 2 (2014) are either saved for continued use pending review as part of the Local Plan Review 2016-2036 Part Two, or are deleted, as set out in Appendix A. Deleted policies will no longer be applied.

1.5 The Local Plan Review 2016-2036 Part Two will focus mainly on development management and other matters of policy detail, on allocations for smaller sites, and the review of the remaining saved planning policies including saved site allocations.

1.6 Saved Policies remain in force until they are updated or deleted (unless they become out of date for other reasons, for example a change in national guidance or local circumstances).

Relationship to Neighbourhood Plans

1.7 The Local Plan Part One provides the strategic context for Neighbourhood Planning. Neighbourhood Plans must be in general conformity with the Development Plan.

1.8 Where Neighbourhood Plans are being prepared the Local Plan Part Two will be tailored so as not to duplicate work communities have committed to undertake, whilst ensuring that all necessary matters are addressed in a consistent and timely manner.

Supporting documents and evidence base

1.9 The following companion documents support the Local Plan 2016-2036 Part One and/or have informed the preparation of the Local Plan policies, including the selection of sites allocated for development.

  • The Sustainability Appraisal (SA) documents how policies and sites were tested to ensure that they achieve environmental, economic and social objectives, and to ensure that the Local Plan as a whole contributes to improvements in environmental, social and economic conditions of the Plan Area. The SA is also a means of identifying and mitigating any potential adverse effects that the Local Plan might otherwise have.
  • A Habitats Regulations Appropriate Assessment (LUC) has assessed whether the Local Plan is likely to have significant effects on International Nature Conservation sites. It shows that Local Plan policies including development proposals are unlikely to have a significant adverse effect on International Nature Conservation sites, provided that the necessary habitat mitigation measures are implemented in an effective and timely manner.
  • The Infrastructure Delivery Plan sets out the infrastructure, services and facilities including open space required to enable new development to take place, how it will be delivered and by whom. It was produced in consultation with infrastructure providers.
  • The Mitigation for Recreational Impacts Supplementary Planning Document sets out how the effects of higher levels of planned housing on internationally designated nature conservation sites will be managed and mitigated e.g. from recreational disturbance. This work was prepared and will be periodically updated in close consultation with the New Forest National Park Authority, Natural England and other key wildlife and ecology interest groups.
  • The Community Infrastructure Levy sets a charge per square metre on development to help pay for infrastructure and mitigation on a defined list of projects or categories of infrastructure. The defined list of projects will be reviewed periodically to ensure CIL is used effectively. Further guidance will be prepared on other developer contributions.

1.10 The Local Plan is informed by a comprehensive evidence base made up of reports and technical studies published on our website, including:

1.11 And the following evidence base background information:

2 Plan Area profile and strategic context

Introduction

2.1 The Plan Area is characterised by a dispersed pattern of small to mediumsized towns and villages within attractive countryside and coastal landscapes. It comprises three separate sub-areas around the edges of the New Forest National Park on the south coast between the city of Southampton and Bournemouth (see Figure 2.1). The Plan Area contains 32% of the New Forest District Council area, and 81% of the District population. The rest of the District lies within the New Forest National Park Authority Local Plan Area.

Icon for pdf Figure 2.1 The Plan Area in relation to New Forest District and National Park [3.2MB]

Strategic context

2.2 The Key Diagram on the following page shows the Plan Area in strategic context.

Relationship to the New Forest National Park

2.3 Historically much of the District was part of the New Forest Heritage Area which pre-dated the formation of the National Park, where successive county and regional plans recognised a need for development constraint.

2.4 In planning for the District area outside the National Park there is a statutory duty to have regard to the purposes of National Parks:

  • To conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the National Park.
  • To promote opportunities for the understanding and enjoyment of the special qualities of the National Park by the public.

2.5 The New Forest National Park is in close proximity to most of the main settlements in the Plan Area, and this Local Plan has been prepared in close cooperation with the New Forest National Park Authority, including joint production of key parts of the evidence base. Sites allocated for development in the Local Plan are predominantly on the settlement edge of towns and villages in areas with strong rural character, in some cases located on the National Park boundary.

Housing markets and economic areas

2.6 The Plan Area is partly within three housing market and travel-to-work areas, which overlap to some extent: Southampton, Bournemouth and to a lesser extent Salisbury.

2.7 The District is a member of the Partnership for South Hampshire (PfSH) and forms part of the Solent Local Economic Partnership (LEP) area (see fig 2.3). PfSH has a significant history of cooperative working on strategic planning matters.

Icon for pdf Key Diagram [3.55MB]

Icon for pdf Figure 2.2 The Plan Area in relation to housing market areas [2.72MB]

The environment

2.8 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) sets out a presumption in favour of sustainable development, including that Local Plans should meet identified needs unless specific policies in the NPPF indicate development should be restricted.

2.9 The policy examples referenced in the NPPF(2012 paragraph 4 footnote 9) (2019 footnote 6) include those policies relating to sites protected under the Birds and Habitats Directives (collectively called 'International Nature Conservation sites' in this Local Plan), and/or designated as Sites of Special Scientific Interest, land designated as Green Belt, Local Green Space, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Heritage Coast or land within a National Park, designated heritage assets, and locations at risk of flooding or coastal erosion.

Icon for pdf Figure 2.3 PfSH and Solent LEP area [4.33MB]

2.10 Within the Plan Area the Habitats Regulations Assessment has shown that all residential development will have an impact on International Nature Conservation sites, and this significantly affects how or whether a presumption in favour of sustainable development can be applied to planning decisions.

2.11 The Plan Area is relatively small, and a small proportion of the Plan Area is free from the type of constraints that, based on the NPPF, may justify restricting development (as illustrated in Figures 2.4 and 2.5). The extent of restrictive designations and significant policy constraints effectively means that much of the Plan Area is either an inappropriate location for built development, and/or should only be considered for development in exceptional circumstances. For example:

2.12 Taking into account land within the Inner Consultation Zone identified by the Health and Safety Executive for certain potentially hazardous military or industrial activities or materials, just 19% of the undeveloped land in the Plan Area is not directly affected by a significantly constraining national policy, safety or environmental constraint. Of this approximately 4,500 hectares of greenfield land, around 950 hectares have locally identified habitat or wildlife value, around 210 hectares are within the strategic land reserve for the Port of Southampton at Dibden Bay, and around 470 hectares are allocated for development in this Local Plan. The majority of the remaining area without significant constraints is in relatively remote rural locations in the Avon Valley and Downlands sub-area.

Icon for pdf Figure 2.4 Map of the Plan Area [738.68KB]

Icon for pdf Figure 2.5 Proportion of the Plan Area already developed or affected by significant constraints [738.68KB]

3 Vision, key issues and strategic objectives

Key issues

3.1 The Local Plan must be a response to the specific issues facing the Plan Area. This chapter sets out 14 Key Issues that the Local Plan must address if it is to be successful - not in any order of importance and inevitably with some overlap between issues.

3.2 This list of Key Issues is a local expression of the requirements and objectives for plan-making set out in national guidance, drawing on the Local Plan review evidence base and accumulated experience of planning for New Forest District.

3.3 The Key Issues are organised thematically reflecting the vision and priorities set out in our Corporate Plan, including:

  • Protecting and enhancing the special and unique character and environment of the New Forest area
  • Providing more homes for local people
  • Supporting local businesses to prosper for the benefit of the community
  • Promoting the safety and wellbeing of people who live and work within the District

Protecting and enhancing the special and unique character and environment of the New Forest area

Key Issue 1: Accommodating development whilst protecting the environment

3.4 What is the right balance between meeting development needs and aspirations within the Plan Area and protecting the quality of the local environment, including avoiding harm to International Nature Conservation sites and to nationally recognised areas of high nature conservation or landscape value such as the New Forest National Park and the Cranborne Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty?

Key Issue 2: Biodiversity and Habitat mitigation

3.5 How can the Local Plan ensure that there is an environmental net gain in the Plan Area? Can the adverse impacts of development on International Nature Conservation sites be avoided or appropriately mitigated, including cumulative air and water quality impacts that mostly arise from outside the Plan Area?

Key Issue 3: Green Belt

3.6 Are there special circumstances that might justify consideration of land in Green Belt for housing or other development and if so to what extent?

Key Issue 4: Character and heritage of towns, villages and rural communities

3.7 How can the Local Plan best conserve and enhance the character and heritage of the Plan Area's towns, villages and rural areas to ensure that new development makes a positive contribution to local distinctiveness and quality of life?

Providing more homes for local people

Key Issue 5: Housing needs and affordability

3.8 How can the Local Plan best address housing needs? There is a high demand for housing from outside the area and there is a limited supply of suitable land for development. House prices are unaffordable to most local residents trying to access the housing market for the first time.

Key Issue 6: Ageing population

3.9 How do we best address the accommodation, care and related needs of our ageing resident population when the proportion of residents aged 65 and over is projected to increase by 40% (13,200) between 2016 and 2036?

Supporting local businesses to prosper for the benefit of the community

Key Issue 7: Local economy

3.10 How can the Local Plan best help local businesses to prosper and provide good quality local employment? What is the right balance between protecting, releasing and allocating new employment land, recognising that the economically active population of the Plan Area is forecast to increase slightly but primarily in age cohorts approaching retirement age, and where opportunities for new development are limited?

Key Issue 8: South Hampshire and the Port of Southampton

3.1 1 How should the Local Plan respond or contribute to supporting the trading and port needs of the national economy as Britain leaves the European Union, and to the economic regeneration of the South Hampshire sub-region, whilst protecting the local environment and ensuring that local communities benefit when major development takes place?

Key Issue 9: Vibrant and sustainable towns and villages

3.12 How can the Local Plan help sustain strong rural communities and ensure the continued viability and vitality of the town centres as local providers of shopping and other needs, in the face of major competition from accessible major centres outside the Plan Area?

Key Issue 10: The rural economy and tourism

3.13 How can the Local Plan encourage sustainable rural enterprise and tourism that will benefit the local economy without harming the environmental and landscape qualities of the area?

Protecting and promoting the safety and wellbeing of people who live and work within the District

Key Issue 11: Meeting the challenge of climate change

3.14 How can the Local Plan respond to the risks posed by climate change including rising sea levels and increased likelihood of flooding, and help to minimise the harmful impacts of development activity and promote renewable resource use within the Plan Area?

Key Issue 12: Infrastructure and local services

3.15 How can the Local Plan help ensure adequate provision of infrastructure and locally accessible services and facilities, when new development can only address its own consequences and cannot be expected to redress historic deficiencies, in a wider context where service-providers are facing budget restraint and pressures to centralise services?

Key Issue 13: Transport and accessibility

3.16 How can the Local Plan maintain, promote and where possible improve access to services, employment, social and leisure opportunities by public transport, cycling and walking, whilst also maintaining safe and convenient access by car for which there is often no practicable alternative (especially in rural areas)?

Key Issue 14: Leisure, culture and recreation

3.17 What provision is needed in the Local Plan to ensure suitable provision for leisure, cultural activities, open space, sports and recreation by all age groups to encourage and enable active and healthy lifestyles?

Local Plan Vision

By 2036 New Forest District (outside the National Park) will be characterised by thriving and prosperous communities that provide for the housing, business and community needs of residents.

The natural beauty and cultural heritage of the adjoining New Forest National Park and Cranborne Chase AONB, and the International Nature Conservation sites and nationally protected habitats in the New Forest area will have been safeguarded and enhanced.

The character, heritage and local distinctiveness of the towns and villages will have been protected and enhanced by contextually appropriate and well-designed development providing a wide spectrum of new homes addressing and prioritising the diverse needs of district residents at all stages of life. New residential development will provide improved facilities for the whole

community, including significant areas of natural recreational green space retaining and enhancing key landscape features and biodiversity in areas of new development. This will provide improved access to the countryside promoting healthy and active lifestyles, whilst also buffering sensitive ecological areas and natural landscapes, and safeguarding the special qualities of the adjoining New Forest National Park. The communities living around it will continue to strongly identity with the New Forest National Park.

Totton and the Waterside will continue to play an important and growing role in the regional and national economy, whilst also protecting and enhancing the International Nature Conservation sites in the New Forest and Solent and functioning as a good neighbour and positive gateway to the New Forest National Park.

The regeneration of the former Fawley Power Station site and new communities north of Totton and Marchwood will provide new opportunities, facilities, and open spaces for residents in the Waterside sub-area.

Within the South Coastal Towns the selective Local Plan release for development of land in sustainable locations that no longer strongly serve the purposes of Green Belt provides significant opportunities for growth for the first time in a generation. Strongly performing Green Belt land will continue to be protected and the recreational, landscape and environmental value of the Green Belt adjoining development locations will be enhanced. The release of land for development will provide more affordable opportunities for younger households to help sustain the vitality and diversity of south coast towns and villages, whilst also better meeting the diverse accommodation needs of older households in the community.

Within the Avon Valley and Downlands area the natural beauty and tranquillity of the Cranborne Chase AONB will continue to be protected. Continued protection of the lower Avon Valley as Green Belt will play an important complementary role in helping to sustain the open views and long vistas which are an essential part of the landscape character of this mainly rural area, and form an important part of the setting of the adjoining New Forest National Park. Planned growth will help to sustain and enhance the vitality of Fordingbridge and Ringwood as market towns, and will enable improvements to flooding and drainage issues in Fordingbridge and Bransgore.

Local Plan strategic objectives

3.18 We have identified ten strategic objectives for the Local Plan review to support and achieve sustainable development. These objectives reflect and express in our local context the main plan-making requirements set out in national planning policy. They draw on the Sustainability Appraisal process but focus on our highest priorities, and also our biggest challenges that require a judgement to be made between potentially conflicting strategic priorities.

To protect and enhance the special character and environment of the New Forest District outside the National Park

SO1: Landscape and the countryside

3.19 To safeguard and where possible enhance the special qualities and landscape character of the Plan Area including the Cranborne Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Solent coastline. To provide an appropriate gateway to and setting for the adjoining New Forest National Park. To maintain and enhance the South West Hampshire Green Belt and to protect locally valued views and landscapes. To facilitate enjoyment of and access to the coast and countryside. To conserve, manage and enhance the setting of heritage assets.

SO2: Biodiversity and environmental quality

3.20 To safeguard and improve biodiversity, and the protection and enhancement of wildlife, species, habitats and water bodies in the Plan Area. To avoid where possible or fully mitigate where necessary, the direct and cumulative impacts of development on designated nature conservation sites. To promote the understanding of and care for the natural environment; managing recreational pressures in sensitive locations. To manage and where possible reduce or mitigate activities that unacceptably impact on air quality or levels of noise, dust, odour or light pollution.

SO3: Built environment and heritage

3.21 To provide high quality, safe and attractive living and working environments in our towns, villages and rural areas. To ensure that valued local character and distinctiveness is maintained, that new development is well-designed and is appropriate in scale, density, form and character to its context and landscape setting. To conserve, manage and where possible enhance listed buildings and other built heritage assets.

To provide more homes for local people

SO4: Housing provision

3.22 To provide at least 10,420 additional homes within the Plan Area during 2016-2036 to help meet the needs of the District within the Southampton, Bournemouth and Salisbury housing market areas, directing larger scale provision to the main towns and larger villages.

SO5: Housing needs, mix and affordability

2.23 To provide a range and choice of good quality new homes by type, size, tenure and location. To ensure that new housing provision as far as possible addresses local housing needs providing, in particular homes more affordable for younger households and a wider spectrum of homes and other measures enabling older residents to continue to live well and remain independent in their New Forest communities.

To support local businesses to prosper for the benefit of the community

SO6: Economic opportunity

3.24 To facilitate a healthy and growing economy operating within environmental limits. To maximise the benefits to local communities from significant new development. To support economic growth that reflects and complements the District's specific qualities and advantages, in particular low impact tourism, knowledge-based enterprises and marine industries. To improve the supply of flexible, modern premises micro and start-up businesses need to establish and grow locally. To support and promote measures that enable local residents and employees to access and take up local employment opportunities including to improve their skills and knowledge required, and enabling services such as childcare provision.

SO7: Vibrant and sustainable towns and villages

3.25 To maintain the economic vitality and viability of town centres. In the main towns to have a good range of facilities providing for the social, cultural, entertainment, economic, shopping, leisure, community, health and educational needs of all sections of the local community. In villages, to maintain and enable local retail and service provision to meet day-to-day needs in rural areas.

SO8: Rural areas and tourism

3.26 To promote a positive future for rural areas and to help secure their economic prosperity and social well-being by supporting farming and traditional commoning practices including back-up grazing, agricultural and rural enterprise, tourism and the diversification of the rural economy in ways which are compatible with environmental and landscape objectives.

To protect and promote the safety and wellbeing of people who live and work within the District

SO9: Climate change and environmental sustainability

3.27 To improve the resilience of local communities to climate change, including managing the risks of flooding and coastal erosion. To prioritise the beneficial re- use of previously developed land and to promote the use of renewable resource and energy sources within sustainable limits. To manage and where possible reduce vehicular emissions and other local factors contributing to climate change or that degrade sensitive environments or quality of life.

SO10: Infrastructure provision and sustainable access to opportunities and facilities

3.28 To secure provision of the social and physical infrastructure necessary to manage the impact of new development on existing services and communities. To enable participation by all age groups in active recreation to facilitate healthy lifestyles, by providing public open space and opportunities for leisure, sport and informal recreation. To improve safe access to opportunities, services and facilities that enable a fulfilling life including by walking, cycling and where viable by enhancements to public transport services.

3.29 Figure 3.1 shows how the Local Plan key issues and strategic objectives relate to each other, and how they are addressed by the policies of the Local Plan.

Figure 3.1: Main relationships between Key issues, objectives and policies
Key IssuesLocal Plan ObjectivePolicies addressing the Objective
1, 3, 7, 10SO1: Landscape and the countrysideSTR1234, ENV2, ENV4
1, 2, 7, 10SO2: Biodiversity and environmental qualitySTR1234, ENV1, Saved DM2
1, 2, 7, 10SO3: Built environment and heritageSTR1, 34, ENV2, ENV3, IMPL2, Saved DM1
5, 6SO4: Housing provisionSTR1, 34, 5, Site policies SS1 - SS18
5, 6SO5: Housing needs, mix and affordabilitySTR1, 34, HOU1, 2, 3, 4, 5, SS1 - SS18
7, 8SO6: Economic opportunitySTR1, 34, 5, 6, ECON1, 2, 3, 4, Site policies SS1, SS4, SS14
9, 10SO7: Sustainable towns and villagesSTR1, 34, ECON5-6
4, 10SO8: Rural areas and tourismSTR1, 34, HOU5, Saved CS19, CS21
2, 11SO9: Climate change and environmental sustainabilitySTR1, 34, 9, CCC1, IMPL2, Saved DM4, DM6
6, 7, 12, 13, 14SO10: Infrastructure provision and sustainable access to opportunities and facilitiesSTR1, 7, 8, CCC2, IMPL1, Saved CS7, DM26

 

Policies / Strategic Objectives12345678910
STR1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STR2

 

 

        
STR3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STR4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  
STR5   

 

 

 

    
STR6     

 

    
STR7         

 

STR8         

 

STR9        

 

 
ENV1 

 

        
ENV2

 

 

 

       
ENV3  

 

       
ENV4

 

         
HOU1    

 

     
HOU2    

 

     
HOU3    

 

     
HOU4    

 

     
HOU5    

 

  

 

  
ECON1     

 

    
ECON2     

 

    
ECON3     

 

    
ECON4     

 

    
ECON5      

 

   
ECON6      

 

   
CCC1        

 

 
CCC2         

 

IMPL1         

 

IMPL2  

 

     

 

 
IMPL3 (Monitoring)          
SS1-18   

 

 

     
Saved CS7         

 

Saved CS19       

 

  
Saved CS21       

 

  
Saved DM1  

 

       
Saved DM2 

 

        
Saved DM4        

 

 
Saved DM6        

 

 
Saved DM26         

 

4 Achieving sustainable development

The spatial strategy

4.1 The strategic policies in this chapter:

  • Identify the development needs that the Local Plan seeks to meet and where they will be provided; and

  • Set out the key implementation principles that will ensure development is delivered in the right place and in a manner that achieves sustainable development that is appropriate to the sensitive environment and character of the Plan Area.

4.2 Taken together the policies of this chapter are the Spatial Strategy for New Forest District outside the New Forest National Park.

Achieving sustainable development

4.3 The National Planning Policy Framework (2012 paragraph 7) (2019 paragraph 8) sets out three overarching objectives to achieve sustainable development:

  • An economic objective - to help build a strong, responsive and competitive economy;
  • A social objective - to support strong, vibrant and healthy communities; and
  • An environmental objective - to contribute to protecting and enhancing our natural, built and historic environment.

4.4 The Local Plan taken as a whole achieves net gains across all three sustainable development objectives, as demonstrated by the Sustainability Appraisal. Identifying sufficient, suitable land to meet development needs poses particular challenges in the Plan Area, which contains extensive areas with high value in habitat or landscape terms, as well as extensive areas subject to flooding or other safety risks. In some cases compromises have been necessary between the three sustainability objectives at the level of individual policies or site allocations, to achieve an acceptable balance for the Local Plan overall.

Policy STR1: Achieving sustainable development

All new development will be expected to make a positive social, economic and environmental contribution to community and business life in the Plan Area by:

Meeting most development needs within settlement boundaries, in a manner that is appropriate for and proportionate to the nature and size of the settlement, and where there is or will be sufficient supporting infrastructure and services;

  1. Ensuring that the housing needs of local communities are addressed by locating new residential development in sustainable and accessible locations, and ensuring that new development provides a mix of types of home by size, tenure and cost to help to address the full spectrum of local housing needs at all stages of life;
  2. Taking a context and landscape-led approach to the siting and design of development to deliver high quality design that maintains local distinctiveness, creates high quality new landscapes and townscapes, safeguards the Green Belt and AONB, sustains and enhances the heritage, scenic and amenity value of the Plan Area, and has appropriate regard to and the purposes of the adjoining New Forest National Park;
  3. Achieving an environmental net gain and avoiding wherever possible or mitigating where necessary the direct and indirect impacts of development on the integrity of the New Forest, Solent, River Avon and other International Nature Conservation sites, and on other areas, species or habitats of nature conservation value;
  4. Ensuring development contributes to a diverse and thriving local economy providing an overall balance of uses, services and opportunities that are accessible by sustainable transport modes as well as by car, in order that reliance on the private car is minimised;
  5. Ensuring communities and workers are safe and feel safe, and the risks to people, places and to the environment from potential hazards including pollution, flooding and climate change effects are minimised;
  6. Ensuring that new development is adaptable to the future needs of occupiers and future-proofed for climate change and innovations in transport and communications technology. 

Protection of the countryside

4.5 Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs) and National Parks are statutorily protected landscapes, recognised by Government to be of the very highest quality. The purposes of these designations are subtly different, but they share a common aim of conserving and enhancing the natural beauty of the English landscape, not just for the present, but also for future generations.

4.6 There is a duty to have regard to the purposes of both AONBs, under the Countryside and Rights of Way Act, 2000 (Section 85), and National Parks, under the Environment Act, 1995 (Section 62).

Policy STR2: Protection of the countryside, Cranborne Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the adjoining New Forest National Park

Development should not have an unacceptable impact on the special qualities and purposes of the Cranborne Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, or on the adjoining New Forest National Park and their settings. In the determination and implementation of development proposals including planned growth, great weight will be given to ensuring that the character, quality and scenic beauty of the Cranborne Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and adjoining New Forest National Park are protected and enhanced.

Supporting text

4.7 Proposals for development within or affecting the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) or the New Forest National Park will need to demonstrate that they have taken account of the objectives, policies and actions set out in the relevant Management Plans for these areas. Proposals for development outside the AONB and the National Park that is sufficiently prominent (in terms of its siting or scale) to have an impact on the area's special qualities must also demonstrate that it would not adversely affect their setting. The strategy for locating new development

4.8 The strategy maintains the established approach in the Plan Area to identifying appropriate locations for development in relation to the existing settlement pattern. The Local Plan evidence base identified sufficient opportunities to meet future needs around the edge of settlements, and within built-up areas or on previously developed land.

Policy STR3: The strategy for locating new development

The strategy is to locate and direct new development to accessible locations that help to sustain the vitality and viability of the towns and villages of the Plan Area as the focal points of commercial activity and community life, and as safe, attractive and accessible locations to use and visit.

Investment and development in town centres and villages that is in accordance with the settlement hierarchy will be supported on environmentally appropriate sites provided that the development achieves a high standard of design that maintains and enhances local character and amenity.

Beyond locations where site-specific policies apply and the built-up area boundary of settlements (as defined on the Policies Map), the primary objectives are to conserve and enhance the countryside and natural environment. Development will generally be restricted unless the development proposed is appropriate in a rural setting in accordance with Saved Policy CS21: Rural economy

Supporting text

4.9 Settlement boundaries include the Strategic Site Allocations set out in Policies SS1 - SS18, and will be further updated through the Local Plan Review Part Two, if required to include any non-Strategic Site Allocations outside the defined built-up areas.

The settlement hierarchy

4.10 The settlement hierarchy provides a guideline to where new development proposals of different types and scales can best be accommodated in a sustainable way, taking into account existing facilities and future potential. The towns and villages in the Plan Area have been classified into a settlement hierarchy based on the availability within the settlement, or ease of access to, the following services, potentially reducing the need to travel:

  • Shops and 'high street' facilities
  • Schools, health and community facilities
  • Proximity to employment locations and main settlements
  • Public transport

Policy STR4: The settlement hierarchy

The settlement hierarchy identifies three tiers of settlements and sets out the nature and scale of development that would be appropriate for each type of settlement. Development which is not in accordance with the settlement hierarchy will normally be resisted.

i. Towns: Fordingbridge, Hythe Village, Lymington, Marchwood, New Milton, Ringwood and Totton. These centres offer access to a wider range of employment, facilities and services. They are the most sustainable locations for large-scale residential, retail, leisure, cultural and business development to improve their self-containment and to support and consolidate their local service offer.

ii. Main villages: Ashford, Blackfield, Bransgore, Everton, Fawley, Hardley, Holbury, Hordle, Langley, Milford-on-Sea and Sandleheath. These villages provide a limited to moderate range of local services and in addition to Strategic Sites where allocated, they are appropriate locations for small to medium-scale development that sustains their current village role in a manner that is cumulatively proportionate. This includes local service and employment uses. Strategic Site 4: the former Fawley Power Station will be treated as equivalent to a main village.

iii. Small rural villages: Breamore, Damerham, Ellingham, Harbridge, Ibsley, Martin, Rockbourne, Sopley and Whitsbury. No built-up area is defined for these small, rural villages and there is a gradual transition from settlement to countryside. These villages have limited access to facilities and workplaces. They are suitable locations for small-scale uses appropriate in a countryside setting and that help to maintain community life, including proportionate and small-scale housing development where it is specifically to meet local housing needs identified by the local community.

Supporting text

4.11 As a general guideline:

  • Large-scale development is defined as for 50 or more homes or 2,500 square metres or more floorspace of non-residential development (gross internal area)
  • Medium-scale is defined as 10-49 homes or 500-2,500 square metres floorspace
  • Small-scale is defined as under 10 homes or less than 500 square metres floorspace

Meeting our housing needs

4.12 The identification of land to meet identified future housing needs is one of the primary purposes of this Local Plan. This policy identifies broadly when and where the objectively assessed need for housing in the Plan Area will be met. The sites and sources of supply have been assessed to ensure that they are suitable, available and likely to be deliverable for housing within the Plan period.

Policy STR5: Meeting our housing needs

The target is to provide at least 10,420 additional homes in the Plan Area for the Plan period 2016-2036, phased as follows:

  • Approximately 1,500 homes (averaging 300 homes per annum) 2016-17 to 2020-21
  • Approximately 2,000 homes (averaging 400 homes per annum) 2021-22 to 2025-26
  • Approximately 7,000 homes (averaging 700 homes per annum) 2026-27 to 2035-36

Provision will comprise:

  1. At least 6,000 homes on Strategic Site Allocations set out in Figure 4.1, in accordance with Strategic Site Allocation Policies SS1 - SS18.
  2. At least 800 homes on sites of 10 or more homes to be identified within or adjoining the defined towns and large villages and allocated in the Local Plan Part Two or in Neighbourhood Plans, which may include sites of 100 or more homes provided that they are within the settlement boundary, to include: a. Around 200 homes on sites to be identified in Lymington and Pennington; b. Around 200 homes on sites to be identified in New Milton Neighbourhood; and c. Around 400 homes on sites to be identified in other towns and large villages.
  3. Existing commitments of approximately 2,755 homes, including saved site allocation policies from the previous Local Plan Part 2; and
  4. An estimated 924 homes on small developments of 1-9 homes reflecting past trends, and developments on affordable housing exception sites in suitable locations in the smaller villages to meet local need for affordable and low cost housing for local people in accordance with Policy HOU5: Rural housing exceptions sites and community-led housing schemes.
Supporting text

4.13 The Strategic Site Allocations of 100 or more homes, identified in Figure 4.1, address the majority of future housing needs not already being met by permitted development proposals or previously allocated sites. The identified capacity of strategic sites is in most cases a minimum target. It reflects what has been demonstrated to be deliverable through preliminary masterplanning work (carried out by the Council in consultation with site promoters), whilst meeting the requirements of other Local Plan policies including public open space requirements and housing mix guidelines, and in relation to mitigating impacts of development on International Nature Conservation sites. Subject to high-quality design and the specific housing mix proposed, it may be possible at detailed design stage that the site capacity exceeds that identified in this Local Plan.

4.14 Development phasing reflects the practical reality of lead-in times required to deliver a near three-fold increase in housing completions compared to the preceding Core Strategy housing target: a step change in delivery can only be achieved in steps. The overall phasing takes into account the views of the promoters of Strategic Site Allocations, and factors relevant to the timing and commencement of development including the potential extraction of minerals.

4.15 Additional non-strategic sites (of less than 100 homes) will be allocated in Neighbourhood Plans and the Local Plan Part Two, providing scope to respond if necessary to overall housing delivery progress before a full review of this Local Plan is due.

4.16 The balance of the required housing supply is expected to come forward on small unidentified ('windfall') sites of under ten homes, plus rural exception sites, reflecting established trends and informed by a review of potential small site supply.

Figure4.1 Estimated housing capacity of Strategic Sites
Strategic SitesSite PolicyEstimated Minimum Capacity (a)
Totton and the Waterside  
Land to the north of TottonSS11,000 (b)
Land south of Bury Road, Marchwood150SS2700
Land at Cork's Farm, MarchwoodSS3150
The former Fawley Power StationSS41380 (c)
South Coastal Towns  
Land at Milford Road, LymingtonSS5185
Land to the east of Lower Pennington Lane, LymingtonSS6100
Land north of Manor Road, Milford on SeaSS7110
Land at Hordle Lane, HordleSS8160
Land east of Everton Road, HordleSS9100
Land to the east of Brockhills Lane, New MiltonSS10130
Land to the south of Gore Road, New MiltonSS11160
Avon Valley and Downlands  
Land to the south of Derritt Lane, BransgoreSS12100
Land at Moortown Lane, RingwoodSS13480
Land to the north of Hightown Road, RingwoodSS14270
Land at Snails Lane, RingwoodSS15100
Land to the north of Station Road, AshfordSS16140
Land at Whitsbury Road, FordingbridgeSS17330
Land at Burgate, FordingbridgeSS18400

(a): Subject to housing mix and detailed testing at planning application stage.

(b): Around 40 additional homes will be achievable on each site if it can be demonstrated that primary school education needs can be met by expanding existing schools rather than by new school provision.

(c): Around 1,500 homes including land allocated in the New Forest National Park Local Plan 2019 (Policy SP26)

Sustainable economic growth

4.17 New Forest District has the highest number of active businesses of any local authority in Hampshire (7,700), a diverse mix of businesses with different and changing needs. The leading business sectors in the district are distribution, transport, accommodation and food including tourism, public administration, education and health, construction and manufacturing. Sectors such as information and communication, finance, professional, scientific and technical are underrepresented when compared with rates for the wider south east and the UK. 4.18 At one end of the spectrum local businesses include nationally significant industrial uses such as the Fawley oil refinery complex, operating in well-established industrial areas and complexes, including some land reserves for future needs. Their primary requirements are a stable, supportive and consistent land use planning environment and good infrastructure links.

4.19 At the other end of the spectrum, micro-businesses typically employing fewer than 10 employees make up 89% of the total. Their business and employment needs are primarily for small and flexible workspaces to start-up in, and to grow on.

4.20 The Local Plan strategy therefore aims to promote sustainable economic growth that is appropriate to the environmental and locational characteristics of the Plan Area. This will be achieved by retaining and supporting existing business sectors, safeguarding opportunities for future employment and business development, supporting the marine industries sector, by encouraging a greater presence of appropriate higher value and knowledge-based businesses, and promoting the development of flexible workspace and accommodation suitable to meet the diverse needs of and support the significant number of small businesses in our area.

4.21 The strategy for sustainable economic growth takes into account that unemployment rates in the Plan Area are currently low, and that with an ageing population the working age population will not increase significantly in the Plan period.

Policy STR6: Sustainable economic growth

The Council strategy for sustainable economic growth is to maintain and enable a vibrant and prosperous local economy offering a diverse range of local employment opportunities, where existing businesses continue to thrive and new businesses have sufficient and suitable opportunities to form and grow in appropriate locations. This will be achieved by:

i. The provision of sufficient land to meet the identified need for 126,000sqm of employment floorspace. This will comprise of:

a. 18 hectares of employment land (for around 70,000sqm floorspace) allocated within residential-led mixed-use Strategic Site Allocations at Totton (SS1), Fawley (SS4) and Ringwood (SS14);

b. 10 hectares of employment land (for around 40,000sqm floorspace) allocated by Saved Policies from the Local Plan Part 2 (2014);

c. Around 10,000sqm of employment floorspace completions 2016-2018, and around 30,000sqm on sites with extant planning permission.

ii. Safeguarding opportunities for future businesses by retaining employment sites and site allocations that are suitable and viable for continued employment use;

iii. Encouraging a greater presence of higher value, knowledge-based businesses;

iv. Supporting the Solent marine industries sector and ensuring that direct access to the coast for commercial marine uses and vessels is maintained if sites that currently provide access are redeveloped;

v. Working with key businesses, transport authorities and other partners in the Waterside area to ensure that its transport infrastructure and capacity is resilient to planned and other potentially significant growth;

vi. Supporting a sustainable rural economy including low environmental impact businesses and tourism;

vii. Promoting development or programmes that provide skills or vocational training, business incubation and mentoring, flexible workspace and conference and meeting facilities, or that support flexible working.

Supporting text

4.22 The Business Needs and Commercial Property Market Assessment (2017) indicates that there is realistic potential demand for around 6,300sqm of business floorspace per annum in the Plan Area. Over the Local Plan period 2016-2036 this equates to 126,000 sqm of business floorspace or a requirement for approximately 32 hectares of employment development land.

4.23 The Partnership for Urban South Hampshire (PUSH) Spatial Position Statement (2016) provides targets for employment provision within the PUSH area of New Forest District (Totton and the Waterside). Need for 32,000sqm of business floorspace is identified for the period 2011 to 2034 (equating to around eight hectares of land). Taking into account allocations in the previous Local Plan in the period 2011- 2016, there is a residual need of around five hectares of employment land within Totton and the Waterside. This figure is within and not additional to the total Plan Area requirement set out in the Commercial Property Market and Business Needs Assessment.

4.24 Taking into account the current availability of around 20 hectares of suitable employment land, including the remaining employment land allocations from the Local Plan Part 2 (2014), the strategy addresses identified local employment needs by the provision of around 18 hectares of new employment land as part of the following residential-led mixed use strategic allocations in accordance with the requirements set out within the Strategic Site Allocation Policies. These are intended to provide for a range and choice of sites in sustainable locations for a variety of business sectors, to provide jobs close to people's homes, and to enable the replacement of business premises that transition to alternative non-employment uses under permitted development rights.

4.25 The South Marine Plan and the Marine Policy Statement are relevant to planning decisions for the sea, coast, estuaries and tidal waters, and for developments that impact these areas. The Solent LEP has published a register of key waterfront employment sites, including the following in the Plan Area: Eling Wharf, Marchwood Industrial Park, Marchwood Port, Hythe Marina Village, Hythe Marine Park, Fawley oil refinery and the former Fawley Power Station.

4.26 The Local Plan strategy also provides a supportive approach to development proposals that would provide skills or vocational training, or business mentoring. This will help to ensure that local people have opportunities to gain the skills needed to access the jobs and opportunities available and local employers have access to a suitably skilled local labour force.

Strategic transport priorities

4.27 The Local Plan strategy for transport and access aims to promote a more integrated and sustainable local transport network, and to facilitate ease of access to local services and facilities supporting planned development and mitigating its cumulative impact on the highways network and other transport services.

4.28 Transport links with neighbouring areas and local accessibility are important to, and have a significant impact on, the lives of communities in the Plan Area. The unusual shape of the Plan Area and dispersed settlement pattern mean that many transport issues within the area need to be considered as part of a bigger picture for a much wider area.

4.29 The Strategic Transport Network Assessment (2016) demonstrated that the cumulative impacts of the planned housing growth set out within Policy STR5: Meeting our housing needs are not severe and the transport impacts of planned development can be accommodated satisfactorily. Planned growth will place increased pressure on the road network at certain locations, but these impacts can be adequately addressed by specific local measures that are capable of being funded by development contributions or provided as part of site developments. The Strategic Site Allocation Policies and Infrastructure Delivery Plan provide further information.

4.30 However it remains important to ensure that future development takes account of land that may be required to deliver existing transport projects, or to address future needs should there be an expansion of port-related transport activity in the Waterside area.

Policy STR7: Strategic transport priorities

The Council will support and facilitate major projects that improve accessibility for pedestrians and cyclists, improve public transport, reduce traffic congestion and improve road safety, provided that they can be achieved without an unacceptable impact on the local environment and local communities.

Supporting text

4.31 Strategic Transport Proposals are projects identified in a strategy or report published by Highways England or by the Highways Authority (Hampshire County Council), including priorities identified in the Local Transport Plan. High priorities for improvement are:

i. A31 Ringwood area (increase the width of the A31 from two lanes to three lanes on the westbound carriages between the Ringwood and Verwood junctions);

ii. A35 east of A326 (repairs to the Redbridge Causeway, capacity improvements and bus priorities Rushington - Millbrook);

iii. A326 capacity and junction improvements including bus priorities.

4.32 Committed strategic transport projects include improvements to the A31 at Ringwood and on the A35 the Redbridge Causeway. Other strategic priorities identified in the New Forest Transport Statement (2012) accompanying the Hampshire County Council Local Transport Plan LTP3 2011-2031, and in the Hampshire Waterside Interim Transport Policy include the A326 corridor, where it may also be necessary to undertake further transport works if there is a future consent for significant port development (see Policies ECON3 and ECON4). Until such time as it is clear whether and what scale of port development might take place, new development within the A326 corridor should be carefully designed and sited so that future A326 capacity enhancement is not unduly prejudiced.

Community services, infrastructure and facilities

4.33 The primary focus of this policy is to set out the strategy to secure or enable provision by the relevant third parties of the infrastructure and community service facilities that are needed, to meet the current and future needs of residents and businesses, and to ensure that planned development can be sustainably accommodated. This involves:

  • Working constructively with infrastructure and service providers to help them to identify and (as planning authority) implement appropriate projects to deliver the facilities or installations required; and
  • Ensuring that the development industry addresses the particular infrastructure and service requirement arising from, or necessary to support or mitigate their development proposals.

4.34 For Local Plan purposes, infrastructure encompasses the provision and maintenance of the facilities, services, and installations needed to make development acceptable and sustainable, and to support our communities and to enable the local economy to thrive, such as (but not limited to):

  • transportation: roads, car parking, bus routes, rail networks, footpaths, cycling routes and cycle parking, electric vehicle charging infrastructure;
  • education facilities: schools, adult learning centres, nurseries and child care;
  • utilities: water, gas and electricity supply; waste treatment works, drains and sewers;
  • surface water drainage
  • telecommunications including superfast fibre broadband and 5G mobile networks;
  • community facilities: sports and leisure facilities, community centres, libraries, places of worship, crematoria and burial space;
  • health care: hospitals, local medical and dental practices;
  • emergency services: fire, police and ambulance facilities;
  • waste: facilities for collection, recovery, recycling and disposal;
  • green spaces: playing fields, sport pitches (New Forest District Council Standards for Formal Open Space August 2017), play facilities, parks and natural recreation areas.

4.35 The preparation of the Local Plan was informed by consultation with infrastructure and service providers, and the Local Plan evidence base includes technical assessments of transport capacity and some other infrastructure and service needs.

4.36 It is important to distinguish between infrastructure and services that are provided to address or mitigate the wider than site-specific impacts of development and growth, the focus of this policy, and infrastructure that is provided to open up sites for development and to meet the on-site needs of future occupiers. The latter is part of the normal cost of undertaking development met by the developer. This typically includes but is not limited to site roads and points of access, parking areas, footpaths, drainage, landscaping and amenity play and open space areas within the site, and the utilities and telecommunications connections to and within the site.

Policy STR8: Community services, infrastructure and facilities

In order to ensure the provision of adequate infrastructure and services to meet the current and future needs of residents and businesses in the Plan Area:

i. The Council will work with:

a. Community service and infrastructure providers and business interests, to support or enable their delivery of transport, utilities, communications and community service infrastructure projects and facilities that help to address the current and future needs of communities and businesses in the Plan Area; and

b. Developers through the planning application process, to ensure that proposed developments make sufficient provision for the needs of future occupiers, and mitigate their impacts on existing services and facilities in accordance with Policy IMPL1: Developer contributions and the requirements set out in the Strategic Site Allocation Policies and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan.

ii. The Council will support proposals for:

c. Utilities, communications and transport infrastructure developments that are designed to avoid wherever possible, otherwise to minimise and adequately mitigate, any adverse environmental, health, safety and landscape impacts.

d. The provision of education, health, social and other community services that are located to be accessible to all sectors of the community.

e. Development to enable innovative delivery of public services including through the use of mobile services and information technology.

iii. There will be a presumption against any development that involves the loss of education, health, social and other community services, unless the use of the site or building is redundant, or the service will be provided in another way following a service review.

Supporting text

4.37 Based on consultations with infrastructure and service providers, the Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) identifies the types of infrastructure required (including capacity and constraints of existing infrastructure) and the potential sources of funding identified to support the delivery of the Local Plan. The IDP is a live document, and its requirements are reflected in the Strategic Site Allocation Policies which set out site-specific requirements for the provision of the infrastructure and services necessary to sustainably accommodate planned growth, including public open space in accordance with Saved Policy CS7: Open Space, Sport and Recreation.

Infrastructure providers

4.38 Infrastructure provision to meet identified needs will be supported provided that it is appropriately designed and located in accordance with the wider policy objectives of this Plan, to avoid or minimise, or if necessary mitigate, potential harmful impacts on the environment, the landscape, or on communities, as part of achieving an overall net environmental gain.

4.39 Where practical, the possibility of sharing infrastructure facilities should be fully explored. For example sharing telecommunications masts or using school premises and facilities for community purposes outside school hours.

Developers

4.40 New development increases the use of, or demand for, existing services and facilities. Where new homes or businesses are developed and there is insufficient capacity to meet additional demand, the essential infrastructure and facilities needed must be provided in a timely manner to provide the capacity to meet the demand created. Policy IMPL1: Developer contributions explains the role of the development industry in meeting the infrastructure and service needs generated by development, or to mitigate its impact on existing facilities.

Mineral resources

Policy STR9: Development on land within a Minerals Safeguarding Area or Minerals Consultation Area

i. Viable mineral resources should not needlessly be sterilised by development. Development proposals on land within a Minerals Safeguarding Area or Minerals Consultation Area as defined in the Hampshire Minerals and Waste Plan should be phased around the appropriate prior extraction of minerals.

ii. Appropriate extraction will depend on:

a. The scale and quality of mineral resource;

b. Ground water levels if they would adversely impact on future re-use of the land;

c. Amenity, environmental and other relevant considerations; and

d. The need to ensure the timely provision of new homes and other development.

iii. Where there is a viable resource, minerals re-use on site for construction is encouraged.

Supporting text

4.41 Where land proposed for development is within a Minerals Safeguarding Area or Minerals Consultation Area, site promoters should undertake a minerals assessment to assess the viability and practicability of prior extraction of the minerals resource in consultation with the Minerals Planning Authority, having regard to the Hampshire Minerals and Waste Local Plan and any relevant supplementary planning guidance.

4.42 Where prior or incidental minerals extraction takes place before housing development, particular care should be taken to protect features of landscape and biodiversity interest within the site to ensure that development including minerals extraction can achieve a net environmental gain compared to the original state of the land.

5. Protecting our special environment

Nature conservation, biodiversity and geodiversity

5.1 As set out in Strategic Objective SO2 and Saved Policy DM2 (Local Plan Part 2, 2014) the overall objective is that developments should protect and enhance biodiversity.

Mitigating the impacts of development on International Nature Conservation sites

5.2 The significant extent and ecological sensitivity of International Nature Conservation sites in and adjoining the Plan Area makes accommodation of the development a major challenge. All development in the Plan Area must meet the requirements of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 and this may significantly affect how or whether a presumption in favour of sustainable development can be applied to planning decisions (NPPF 2012 paragraph 119, NPPF 2019 paragraph 177).

5.3 The Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA) of the Local Plan identifies that without appropriate mitigation, planned development (either alone or in combination with development elsewhere) would be likely to have a range of significant effects on a number of International Nature Conservation sites, or that significant effects could not be ruled out. These include potential effects on plants and species due to traffic emissions on roads through the New Forest, water quality impacts from increased discharge of phosphorus or nitrogen to the River Avon or to the Solent and Southampton Water respectively, and recreational disturbance in the Solent and New Forest arising from an increased population.

5.4 Where harmful impacts are identified to be likely, development can only take place where that harm is avoided, or fully mitigated if it cannot be avoided. Avoidance of harm is best achieved by not locating high impact activities in sensitive locations, but within the Plan Area this cannot be wholly avoided. Where harmful effects cannot be ruled out, the requirements of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 can best be met by applying the Precautionary Principle to avoid or mitigate possible harm.

5.5 Mitigation measures will be applied until such time as it can be demonstrated (based on monitoring and review of the impact of mitigation measures through the Local Plan review process) that it can reasonably be concluded that development is unlikely to have a harmful effect on International Nature Conservation sites.

Policy ENV1: Mitigating the impacts of development on International Nature Conservation sites

1. Except as provided for in the first paragraph of Saved Policy DM2: Nature Conservation, Biodiversity and Geodiversity, development will only be permitted where the Council is satisfied that any necessary mitigation, management or monitoring measures are secured in perpetuity as part of the proposal and will be implemented in a timely manner, such that, in combination with other plans and development proposals, there will not be adverse effects on the integrity of any of the following International Nature Conservation sites:

  • The New Forest Special Area of Conservation (SAC), the New Forest Special Protection Area (SPA) and the New Forest Ramsar site;
  • The Solent Maritime SAC, Solent and Isle of Wight Lagoons SAC, the Solent and Southampton Water SPA, and the Solent and Southampton Water Ramsar site;
  • The River Avon SAC, Avon Valley SPA and Ramsar site; and
  • The River Itchen SAC.

2. For residential development and the provision of overnight visitor accommodation adverse effects can be adequately mitigated by implementing approved measures relevant to the site location, including as set out in the Mitigation for Recreational Impacts SPD and in the Solent Recreation Mitigation Strategy, and in supplementary guidance on nutrient management.

3. For non-residential developments, the requirement for mitigation will be considered on case-by-case basis with regard to the nature, scale and location of the proposed use.

4. The approved mitigation measures for residential developments currently include:

i. For developments providing 49 or fewer net additional units of residential accommodation, financial contributions towards the provision of recreational mitigation measures as set out below and in the Mitigation for Recreational Impacts SPD:

(a) Projects for the provision of alternative natural recreational green spaces and recreational routes: new or improved open space and recreational routes of a quality and type suitable to attract residents of new development within the Plan Area who might otherwise visit the International Nature Conservation sites for recreation; and

(b) Access and Visitor Management: measures to manage the number of recreational visits to the New Forest and Solent Coast International Nature Conservation sites; and to modify visitor behaviour within those sites so as to reduce the potential for harmful recreational impacts; and

(c) Monitoring of the impacts of new development on the International Nature Conservation sites and establishing a better evidence base: to reduce uncertainty and inform future refinement of mitigation measures.

ii. For developments of 50 or more net additional residential dwellings:

(a) Direct provision by the developer of at least eight hectares of natural recreational greenspace per 1,000 population located on the development site or directly adjoining and well connected to it; and

(b) A financial contribution towards Access and Visitor Management and Monitoring as set out above at i(b) and i(c).

iii. Additionally for all residential developments within 5.6km of the Solent and Southampton Water SPA, as shown on Figure 5.1, a financial contribution is required towards a Solent-wide programme of visitor management, monitoring and development mitigation projects.

iv. Additionally for residential developments and the provision of overnight visitor accommodation draining or discharging wastewater to the River Avon in relation to phosphate neutrality or to the Solent and Southampton Water in relation to nitrogen neutrality, a financial contribution or other appropriate mechanisms to achieve nutrient-neutral development.

v. Additionally for all residential developments, a financial contribution towards monitoring and, if necessary (based on future monitoring outcomes) managing or mitigating air quality effects within the New Forest SPA, SAC and Ramsar site.

Supporting text
Policy scope

5.6 The primary focus of this policy is the mitigation of impacts of residential development on internationally designated nature conservation sites, as most of the development proposed in the Local Plan is for housing.

5.7 The mitigation requirements for residential development apply to all forms of new residential development resulting in the net gain of a self-contained dwelling. This includes new build homes, redevelopment, mixed-use schemes, changes of use including under Permitted Development rights, conversions, affordable housing, sheltered housing, extra care housing, second homes, visitor accommodation, and gypsy and traveller pitches.

5.8 Residential and institutional care homes (Use Class C2) are not considered likely to generate recreational impacts on International Nature Conservation sites, but may generate water quality impacts especially if located in the River Avon or Solent catchments.

5.9 Non-residential development may also generate impacts that require mitigation. The diversity of possible activities means it is not possible or practical to identify appropriate mitigation measures for every eventuality. Planning applications will need to include an assessment of the potential effects of the development proposed on International Nature Conservation sites, and include appropriate mitigation measures where adverse impacts cannot be screened out.

5.10 In general terms, for non-residential uses air quality and water quality impacts are more likely to be relevant issues for mitigation. The main exception is visitor or recreational activities, where recreational impacts of visitors are likely to require mitigation. Mitigation contributions will be required for hotel and visitor accommodation, and a unit of visitor accommodation will be treated as equivalent to a home for the purposes of calculating mitigation contributions, whether or not it is self-contained.

5.11 The general (rather than site-specific) recreational impacts of employees can be screened out, as there is a net commuting outflow from the district.

Mitigation of recreational impacts from residential development

5.12. The Plan Area has easy access to the New Forest National Park and to the Solent coast. International Nature Conservation sites in these areas require the highest levels of protection. A growing local population and the large numbers of summer visitors increase the pressures on sensitive habitat areas.

5.13 The New Forest SPA is home to a number of very rare birds which nest on or near the ground during the spring and early summer, and the habitats of the New Forest SPA provide suitable feeding for the birds. The New Forest SAC is particularly important for the diversity of its habitats and the range of rare and scarce species which it supports. It is designated for a range of rare habitats, including European dry heaths, northern Atlantic wet heaths, oligotrophic waterbodies, and Molinia meadows. On the Solent, recreational walking and dog-walking can adversely affect breeding, ground-nesting or over-wintering birds.

5.14 Management measures include a ranger service and the provision of advice and information to visitors to enable them to enjoy the New Forest and the Solent coast in ways that have less impact on habitat sites and protected species, especially in sensitive periods such as the nesting season, and ongoing habitat monitoring. Mitigation measures focus on the provision of natural green spaces which are conveniently accessible to the future residents of a development, that provide a suitable recreational alternative to divert some visits which may otherwise have been made to the New Forest and Solent Coast International Nature Conservation sites.

The GreenWay Project

5.15 The Mitigation for Recreational Impacts SPD sets out a programme of measures and projects collectively branded the GreenWay Project, to relieve recreational pressures on sensitive habitats by:

  • Enhancing existing green spaces
  • Enhancing the extensive network of walking routes that exist outside of the sensitive areas
  • Providing Rangers to help manage sensitive areas, and to inform and influence visitor behaviour
  • Providing natural green spaces as part of new residential development.

5.16 Contributions are required for all new dwellings located anywhere in the Plan Area to fund a package of mitigation measures. For developments of 50 or more homes, the natural recreational greenspace element will be provided in kind by the developer on land either on or directly adjoining the site. The 50-home threshold reflects Natural England advice and the practical limitations of achieving a suitable layout to meet recreational mitigation requirements on sites below this threshold. A financial contribution to the monitoring and recreational management elements of the GreenWay Project will also be required, and for the in-perpetuity management and maintenance of the mitigation land.

5.17 On all sites likely to contain 50 or more homes when fully implemented, alternative natural recreational greenspace (ANRG) must be available for use at the point of dwelling occupation, in proportion to the number of residents likely to occupy the homes completed.

5.18 Off-site contributions are not an acceptable alternative to the provision of on-site alternative natural recreational greenspace (ANRG) for development phases on sites likely to contain 50 or more homes, even if that phase is for less than 50 dwellings. Provided that there is an appropriate design solution and enforceable landowner agreements are in place relating to the quantum, location and timing of provision, ANRG provision need not be on the planning application development parcel itself and may be located elsewhere within the wider development.

5.19 If pro-rata areas of ANRG are proposed on smaller individual sites within a larger development, these will only be acceptable provided that they are in general accordance with either the Strategic Site concept master plan, or are part of a suitable pre-agreed alternative masterplanning approach, and where delivery of the ANRG is concurrent with housing delivery. This is to ensure that appropriate mitigation measures for the full proposal are properly considered at the outset in both quantitative and design terms.

5.20 The design, management and maintenance of recreational mitigation areas is important to ensure that they are, and remain, safe and attractive areas for recreational walking and dog exercising. Working with Natural England the Council has established design guidelines and parameters for recreational mitigation land, to ensure it provides effective mitigation by creating attractive recreational walking and dog-walking routes and spaces. The design guidelines are set out in the Mitigation for Recreational Impacts SPD, and suitable arrangements are illustrated in the Strategic Site Allocation Policy concept master plans, forming part of an integrated approach that will also meet Local Plan objectives to provide net gains for biodiversity and for landscape protection and enhancement (Policy STR1: Achieving sustainable development; Policy ENV4: Landscape character and quality).

5.21 To be effective and used, recreational mitigation land must also be safe and appear safe to use. Woodland areas may be acceptable if under a high level of management, but densely wooded areas may not be attractive to users concerned about their personal safety.

5.22 It will not generally be appropriate to use for recreational mitigation purposes land that has existing species or habitat value, unless it can be demonstrated that its existing habitat value would not be compromised by increased public and dog access.

5.23 In some instances it will not be possible to provide recreational mitigation land on or adjoining sites of 50 or more homes, for example on redevelopment sites in existing built-up areas. In these circumstances the developer should put forward the required eight hectares per 1,000 population of land for recreational mitigation in an alternative location that will provide equivalent benefits to the settlement where the site is located, preferably in close proximity to the site.

5.24 In all circumstances developers may put forward their own, alternative mitigation measures, provided that they fulfil the requirements of the Habitat Regulations, and are demonstrated to be sufficient by supporting evidence and justification including a project level Appropriate Assessment. Alternative proposals and supporting evidence must be submitted as part of the planning application to inform its determination, setting out enforceable delivery and in-perpetuity maintenance arrangements. Prior consultation with the Council and Natural England is recommended.

Bird Aware Solent

5.25 Bird Aware Solent is the 'brand' name of the Solent Recreation Mitigation Partnership, which comprises fifteen Solent local authorities including New Forest District, the New Forest National Park Authority, Natural England, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Wildlife Trust, and the Chichester Harbour Conservancy. The strategy aims to manage disturbance of birds over-wintering in the Solent from increasing coastal recreational activities. It seeks to do this through a series of projects and management measures including a ranger service which actively encourage all coastal visitors to enjoy their visits in a responsible manner. To fund this work, contributions are required from new dwellings within 5.6km of the Solent SPA as shown in Figure 5.1. Details are set out in the Solent Recreation Mitigation Strategy (2017)

Icon for pdf Figure 5.1 Map of the Solent Recreation Mitigation Strategy 5.6km area [3.36MB]

5.26 The Solent and Southampton Water SPA and Ramsar is designated to protect a range of wading and migratory birds, species which also rely on areas outside the SPA boundary.

5.27 There is potential for new development on land adjacent to or in close proximity to Solent waders and Brent Goose sites to impact on the ecological function of the Solent and Southampton Water SPA network. Proposals for development on terrestrial waders and Brent Goose sites located on land identified in the Solent Waders and Brent Goose Strategy should have due regard to the mitigation measures set out in that strategy.

Water quality and the mitigation of nutrient enrichment

The River Avon

5.28 Phosphorus concentrations in the River Avon have reached a level where adverse effects upon the integrity of the River Avon SAC cannot be ruled out. Natural England and the Environment Agency advice is that new development should therefore be phosphorus neutral to the River Avon, until a long-term solution is identified, for example through the OFWAT 2024 price review for water and wastewater service providers.

5.29 The Planning Authorities in the River Avon catchment working with Wessex Water, Natural England and the Environment Agency will identify suitable mitigation or offsetting measures to enable development proposals to achieve phosphate neutrality, including an update of measures set out in the River Avon Nutrient Management Plan. The River Itchen and the Solent

5.30 Evidence suggests uncertainty as to whether or not housing development in southern Hampshire in the later part of the Plan period would be likely to have a significant adverse effect on the River Itchen and the Solent due to nutrient enrichment. Applying the precautionary principle, subsequent Natural England advice is that harmful effects cannot be ruled out from the development of additional dwellings, visitor or institutional overnight accommodation. In the longer term the situation may be resolved by future arrangements for water supply and wastewater treatment in south Hampshire, which have their own regulatory processes. Until any such arrangements are operational, new development in the Solent must achieve nitrate neutrality for both foul drainage and surface water run-off by other appropriate means, on- or off-site.

5.31 The Council will support the Environment Agency, Natural England, water companies and surrounding authorities in the development and implementation of solutions to achieve nitrate neutral development and projects which reduce nutrient inputs to the Solent designated sites from wastewater discharges. Where necessary based on evidence of harmful impacts or by application of the precautionary principle, additional mitigation measures may be applied to developments that directly or indirectly discharge wastewater into the Solent.

Air Quality in the New Forest

5.32 Modelling of traffic emissions from cumulative traffic growth over the Plan period has identified potential for significant adverse effects of parts of the New Forest SPA and SAC from nitrogen deposition and ammonia, particularly near main road corridors through the New Forest in areas lacking screening woodlands.

5.33 There are uncertainties in the data, but the precautionary principle applies requiring a modest financial contribution from development to ongoing monitoring of the effects of traffic emissions on sensitive locations, to trigger management or mitigation measures and developer contributions to implement them if harmful effects are confirmed in the future.

5.34 If future air quality monitoring identifies that significant adverse effects are occurring or likely, legal agreements or other appropriate mechanisms will be put in place to ensure that homes subsequently permitted would be required to make reasonable and proportionate developer contributions for air quality management or mitigation.

The South West Hampshire Green Belt

5.35 The extent of the Green Belt in the Plan Area is shown on the Policies Map. It covers areas outside defined settlement boundaries in all of the South Coastal Towns sub-area, and all of the Avon Valley and Downlands sub-area to the south of Ringwood. It adjoins more extensive Green Belt areas in Dorset that preserve the openness of countryside around the Christchurch, Bournemouth and Poole conurbation.

5.36 National policy (NPPF 20212 paragraph 80, NPPF 2019 paragraph 134) identifies that the Green Belt serves five purposes:

  • to check the unrestricted sprawl of large built-up areas
  • to prevent neighbouring towns merging into one another
  • to assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment
  • to preserve the setting and special character of historic towns
  • to assist in urban regeneration, by encouraging the recycling of derelict and other urban land.

5.37 With new development focused on the edge of existing towns and villages, the spatial strategy also seeks to maintain the distinct identity of settlements. Continuing to maintain the Green Belt and gaps between settlements therefore forms part of the spatial strategy.

5.38 The designation of Green Belt in the New Forest area first received ministerial support in 1960, although the South West Hampshire Green Belt was first formally designated by the Hampshire Structure Plan in 1983. The Hampshire Structure Plan Review (2000) removed from Green Belt areas that would become part of the then pending New Forest National Park, retaining the remaining Green Belt and restating its purposes as follows in the context of the establishment of the New Forest National Park:

"A Green Belt will be maintained in South West Hampshire south of Ringwood between the county boundary; coast and New Forest Heritage Area. Proposals for development within it will be subject to policies to check the unrestricted sprawl of large built-up areas; prevent neighbouring towns from merging into one another and assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment."

5.39 This Local Plan Review included the first full review in 2016 of the South West Hampshire Green Belt since the formation of the New Forest National Park, in recognition that there was unlikely to be sufficient, suitable development land to meet development needs unless the release of Green Belt land for development was considered. The 2016 review concluded that most of the Green Belt continues to serve the purposes of the Green Belt very well, but also identified some areas that made a weaker contribution to Green Belt purposes. Those areas making a weaker contribution that were also in appropriate locations for strategic housing development have been removed from the Green Belt.

Policy ENV2: The South West Hampshire Green Belt

The openness and permanence of the South West Hampshire Green Belt will be preserved with particular regard to its stated purposes and those of national policy for the Green Belt. Development proposals in the Green Belt will be determined in accordance with national planning policy.

Supporting text

5.40 National policy is that the fundamental aim of Green Belt policy is to prevent urban sprawl by keeping land permanently open. The construction of new buildings is generally regarded as inappropriate development in Green Belt, with a limited range of exceptions (NPPF 20212 paragraph 89-90, NPPF 2019 paragraph 145-146). Inappropriate development is, by definition, harmful to the Green Belt and can only be considered in very special circumstances where the potential harm to the Green Belt by reason of inappropriateness, and any other harm, is clearly outweighed by other considerations.

5.41 In line with exceptions set out in national policy for development in the Green Belt, the provision of green space for natural recreational mitigation and public open space is regarded as appropriate development in the Green Belt, provided that it is implemented in accordance with the requirements of Policy ENV1: Mitigating the impacts of development on International Nature Conservation sites and any applicable Strategic Site Allocation Policy.

5.42 In terms of very special circumstances that may justify development in the Green Belt, the provision of affordable housing to meet the needs of local people that could not otherwise be provided for, may meet this test. This is provided that the housing developments are non-strategic in scale (less than 100 homes), and are bought forward in the Green Belt through a Neighbourhood Development Plan, a Community Right to Build Order or as a Community-led Housing Scheme in accordance with Policy HOU5: Rural housing exception sites and community led housing schemes. In such circumstances the land will remain in the Green Belt until the development is completed, but may be removed at the next Local Plan review.

Design quality and local distinctiveness

5.43 The Plan Area is characterised by generally high environmental quality with towns and villages set within attractive countryside with significant visual, recreational, heritage and ecological value. The qualities of the area and the sensitivities of its landscapes and habitats demand commensurate care and attention to quality in new development.

5.44 The objective of this policy is to create high-quality places that enhance local character and distinctiveness, that connect well to existing development, that offer a high-quality living environment for current and future residents, and also offer attractive green spaces and opportunities for wildlife. By achieving these objectives new development can contribute to achieving an environmental net gain, which in the context of the Plan Area is essential to achieving sustainable development.

5.45 Most of the Local Plan Strategic Site Allocations are on the countryside edge of towns and villages. A significant proportion of the site allocations will bring developed areas closer to the edge of the New Forest National Park, and closer to areas of identified ecological significance. These are locations where overintensive or urbanised development forms are unlikely to be suitable or contextually appropriate, and where poorly designed development would have the potential to cause significant harm. National policy is that 'planning permission should be refused for development of poor design that fails to take the opportunities available for improving the character and quality of an area and the way it functions' (NPPF 20212 paragraph 64, NPPF 2019 paragraph 130).

5.46 Whilst the primary focus of the Local Plan is on delivering housing, the principles of this policy are equally applicable to other forms of development.

Policy ENV3: Design quality and local distinctiveness

All development should achieve high quality design that contributes positively to local distinctiveness, quality of life and enhances the character and identity of the locality by creating buildings, streets, places and spaces that are:

  • Functional: well connected to surrounding uses, and logically laid out so that different elements work well together in a manner that is safe to access, easy to navigate, convenient to use and that makes effective use of both developed land and open spaces;
  • Appropriate: sympathetic to its environment and context, respecting and enhancing local distinctiveness, character and identity; and
  • Attractive: visually appealing and enjoyable to be in.

New development will be required to:

i. Create buildings, streets and spaces which are sympathetic to the environment and their context in terms of layout, landscape, scale, height, appearance and density and in relationship to adjoining buildings, spaces and landscape features;

ii. Avoid unacceptable effects by reason of visual intrusion or overbearing impact, overlooking, shading, noise and light pollution or other adverse impacts on local character or residential amenity;

iii. Create buildings, streets and spaces which are accessible to those with disabilities or of reduced mobility, that are safe and easy to navigate, and that minimise opportunities for anti-social and criminal behaviour or other public threats;

iv. Integrate sufficient car and cycle parking spaces so that realistic needs are met in a manner that is not prejudicial to the character and quality of the street, highway safety, emergency or service access or to pedestrian convenience and comfort;

v. Incorporate design measures that improve resource efficiency and climate change resilience and reduce environmental impacts wherever they are appropriate and capable of being effective, such as greywater recycling and natural heating and cooling, and the use of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS);

vi. Provide appropriately designed green spaces including sufficient planting, and where applicable: provision for play, sports and natural green spaces for recreational mitigation; and

vii. Enhance the sense of place by ensuring that buildings, streets and spaces are attractive to look at through good architecture, landscape and street design.

Supporting text

5.47 The Council has published a number of Design Statements, Local Distinctiveness Guides and Conservation Area Appraisals which will assist in identifying the features and characteristics of the Plan Area that are valued by local communities.

5.48 For residential developments, further guidance is provided in the Strategic Site Allocation Policies.

5.49 The use of Design and Access Statements as a means of securing good quality design is strongly encouraged.

Landscape character and quality

5.50 Where development takes place the character of the landscape or townscape will inevitably change, especially if the land is currently countryside. The key to the achievement of a net environmental gain in landscape terms is to ensure that the change arising from development is as positive as it can be. By retaining and augmenting key landscape and townscape features, as part of creating a strong landscape framework for new development, the place created can have its own distinctive landscape character and quality whilst also relating well to its landscape context.

Policy ENV4: Landscape character and quality

Where development is proposed there is a requirement to retain and/or enhance the following landscape features and characteristics through sensitive design, mitigation and enhancement measures, to successfully integrate new development into the local landscape context:

i. Features that contribute to a green infrastructure and distinctive character within settlements including the locally distinctive pattern and species composition of natural and historic features such as trees, hedgerows, woodlands, meadows, field boundaries, coastal margins, water courses and water bodies;

ii. Features that screen existing development that would otherwise have an unacceptable visual impact;

iii. Existing or potential wildlife corridors, footpath connections and other green links that do, or could, connect the site to form part of an integrated green infrastructure network;

iv. The landscape setting of the settlement and the transition between the settlement fringe and open countryside or coast;

v. Important or locally distinctive views, topographical features and skylines; and

vi. Areas of tranquillity and areas of intrinsically dark skies.

Supporting text

5.51 The creation of a robust Green Infrastructure framework of spaces, trees, planted features, links, watercourses and corridors will be of fundamental importance to the character, quality and sustainability of new developments that take place in the Plan Area. The first step towards achieving this is to analyse and document the landscape qualities of the site within its wider setting using a recognised methodology, to underpin the design and masterplanning process.

5.52 The Policies Map identifies some features of local landscape value (The identified features are not an exhaustive list and may be supplemented by further features that may be identified in Part Two of the Local Plan Review, by Neighbourhood Plans, by other future Supplementary Planning Documents, or by landscape assessments prepared in support of planning applications) relevant to the application of Policy ENV4 that were identified by Saved Policy DW-E12 of the New Forest District Local Plan First Alteration (2005).

Saved Policies

5.53 The following Saved Policies may also be relevant:

- Saved Policy DW-E12: Protection of Landscape features

- Saved Policy CS7: Open spaces, sport and recreation

- Saved Policy DM1: Heritage and Conservation

- Saved Policy DM2: Nature conservation, biodiversity and geodiversity

- Saved Policy DM8: Protection of public open space, private recreation land and school playing fields

- Saved Policy DM9: Green Infrastructure linkages

6. Housing

6.1 Policy STR5: Meeting our housing needs together with the Strategic Site Policies set out how and where the objectively assessed housing need for 10,420 homes will be provided in the Plan period. The policies of this chapter provide guidance on the types of homes to be provided to meet identified community needs, including for parts of the community with particular needs.

6.2 For policies on householder development and other non-strategic housing policy matters see also the Saved Policies (listed at Appendix A) and the relevant Supplementary Planning Documents and other published guidance.

Housing type, size, tenure and choice

6.3 To sustain a mixed and balanced community requires the provision of a variety of housing to rent and to buy, to meet the different needs of the community. In addition to responding to market demand, this will include providing homes that are affordable for households on moderate and lower incomes, homes for families with children, couples, single person households and homes designed to meet the needs of older people and people with disabilities.

Policy HOU1: Housing type, size, tenure and choice

The strategy is to ensure that all residential development helps to address the diversity of housing needs of local people at all stages of life by providing a mix and choice of homes by type, size, tenure and cost.

The policy objectives are to improve the diversity of housing choice, and to achieve an overall balance of housing provision in general accordance with housing needs evidence. Each development should contribute appropriately to improving housing diversity wherever possible, taking into account the location, size and characteristics of the site, the form of development proposed and the viability of the scheme.

Supporting text

6.4 Policy HOU1 seeks the provision of a greater range and quantity of the following types and tenures in appropriate locations:

  • Entry level and other lower cost forms of market housing, including flats and smaller houses, to buy or for private rent
  • Accommodation suitable for households requiring enhanced accessibility standards
  • Homes which provide specialised care on-site including sheltered and extra care housing
  • Homes attractive to active older households and down-sizers, including bungalows and smaller homes with higher accessibility and space standards
  • Plots for self- and custom-build housing, including for travellers
  • Affordable housing in accordance with Policy HOU2

6.5 Evidence of housing need in the Plan Area will be updated over time and development proposals will be assessed in light of the most robust and up-to-date information. Current evidence summarised in Figure 6.1 suggests a need for a greater proportion of new stock to be smaller-to-medium-sized homes. Larger homes continue to form part of future new home supply, but the existing housing stock of the Plan Area is predominantly 3 and 4-bedroom homes, and turnover within the existing stock will continue to be the main source of supply for meeting future demand for larger homes.

Figure 6.1: Indicative need for different sizes and tenures of home
 1-2 bed3 bed4 bed
Affordable rental homes60-70%25-30%5-10%
Affordable home ownership55-65%30-35%5-10%
Market homes30-40%40-45%20-25%

6.6 Provision of more, smaller homes will help to meet the needs of newly forming households, including those not eligible for affordable housing. Smaller homes should be designed to be affordable and to meet the needs of newly forming households, or to be attractive to 'down-sizers' when they no longer need their family home (see Policy HOU3: Residential accommodation for older people). Provision of smaller homes could also include homes designed for private rent in appropriate locations, as private rented homes play an important role in meeting needs for lower cost market housing for lower income residents who are unlikely to qualify for affordable housing and are unable to purchase a home.

6.7 Based on demographic evidence there is an element of need for one-bedroom homes. One-bedroom homes are considered more likely to meet both need and occupier preferences where they are provided either as private rental accommodation, or as low-cost or affordable extra-care accommodation. For home buyers and providers of affordable housing, two-bedroom homes offer much more flexibility for changing needs.

6.8 Strategic housing site allocations are large enough to accommodate areas of different character and density within them, and are expected to include a broad mix of new homes more closely corresponding to Figure 6.1. Large new developments of predominantly 3-4 bedroom homes would not meet the requirements of this policy.

6.9 The viability of housing sites of 100 or more homes has been tested on the basis that the requirement for housing diversification would be met alongside and in addition to the provision of affordable housing. Viability testing included that around 5% of the market housing would be provided in the form of a modest 2-bedroom entry level or starter homes offered at a 20-25% discount to open market value.

6.10 Viability testing also included the provision of smaller bungalows. On the rural edge of settlements where lower densities may be necessary for reasons of contextual appropriateness or landscape sensitivity, bungalows and self-build plots are a form of development that may be especially suitable.

6.11 There is an element of demand for self and custom-build housing opportunities in the Plan Area. This is a form of housing provision national policy seeks to encourage to help diversify housing supply. However, the challenges in meeting the general housing needs of the local population are such that the Local Plan cannot respond to all self-build aspirations and the development industry already offers home buyers some scope for home customisation or custom build. The particular aim of this part of the policy is therefore to address the lack of supply of moderately priced, serviced land parcels sufficient for local people wishing to build an average family home, either by self-build or by contracting their own independent builder.

6.12 Where serviced self-build plots are provided, legal agreements or other appropriate mechanisms will be put in place to ensure that for a reasonable period, the first opportunity to purchase is offered to persons already on the New Forest District Self-Build and Custom Housebuilding Register who can demonstrate a local connection to New Forest District (including the New Forest National Park).

Affordable housing

6.13. Market housing is less affordable in the Plan Area than in surrounding districts and a high proportion of the total identified need for housing is for affordable housing: 361 homes per annum representing 69% of the total annual housing requirement.

6.14 To address the housing needs of those unable to afford market housing, including workers providing essential community services, a significant proportion of the housing built will need to be affordable housing. Under current (as at 2018) Government funding arrangements, most of the affordable housing that will be provided in the future will be built by developers as part of a market housing development without external funding support. The Council has therefore considered the economic viability of development in setting the affordable housing target. The analysis takes into account the policy requirements of this Local Plan including habitat mitigation, and the developer contributions that are necessary to provide sufficient community facilities and infrastructure, whilst also providing a reasonable financial return to both land owners and developers. The need to ensure that housing development is viable means that not all affordable or specialised housing needs can be met.

6.15 The provision of social rented affordable housing is a high Council priority, and the Council will continue to be a significant provider of social rented housing. Around 30% of households cannot afford to pay more than 'social rents', a social housing tenure which plays an important role for households, including families on single low incomes that are unable to afford the higher 'affordable rents'.

6.16 As at 2018 National Planning Policy states that developments below certain size thresholds are not required to provide affordable housing.

Policy HOU2: Affordable housing

There is a requirement for all new developments of 11 or more dwellings, or of more than 1,000 sqm gross internal area of residential floorspace, to provide affordable housing as follows:

i. In Totton and the Waterside area, the target is for 35% of new homes to be affordable housing.

ii. In the rest of the Plan Area, the target is for 50% of new homes to be affordable housing.

iii. The tenure mix target is to provide 70% of affordable homes for rent, split equally between social and affordable rent, and 30% intermediate or affordable home ownership tenures including shared ownership.

iv. Affordable housing provided should be indistinguishable in appearance from the market housing on site, and distributed evenly across the site.

The viability of development will be taken into account in applying this policy as set out in Policy IMPL1: Developer contributions.

Supporting text

6.17 Where there is a particular local need social rented housing will be sought in the form of family housing, with commensurate adjustments to the size, tenures and mix of other forms of affordable housing to be provided, to achieve equivalent development viability.

6.18 It is anticipated that most intermediate/affordable home ownership products will be in the form of shared ownership housing, especially in higher value areas. Discounted or low-cost home ownership products will be accepted as affordable housing if a lower quartile income household could afford to purchase the home at the offered price with a 10% deposit and a mortgage of four times household income. 'Starter homes' at a discount to market value are unlikely to qualify as affordable housing, but can assist in meeting demand for entry level market housing.

6.19 Affordable housing tenure mix flexibility will also be applied where a development is primarily providing a specialised form of housing such as build-for-rent or certain forms of older persons housing, where the provision of some forms or tenures of affordable housing would be incompatible with the nature or purpose of the development.

6.20 Whilst the affordable housing target will be viable in most circumstances, especially on previously undeveloped land, variations to the affordable housing tenure mix or affordable housing target will be supported where it is demonstrated to be necessary.

6.21 Variations are more likely to be demonstrably justifiable on previously developed land, and in some circumstances on smaller greenfield sites in lower value areas. It is also recognised that the estimated costs of necessary infrastructure or facilities may change or, exceptionally, unforeseen circumstances may arise which make delivery of the full affordable housing requirement unviable. Where there are no other mechanisms available to improve the viability of a housing development to a fair profit level, the Council will consider varying the affordable housing tenure mix, and if necessary the timing of delivery, before considering whether a reduced level of affordable housing provision would be acceptable. In exceptional circumstances, consideration may be given to alternative mechanisms to secure the equivalent delivery of affordable housing off-site.

6.22 In such circumstances it will be for the developer to clearly demonstrate why any exception from the policy is necessary, and to provide this information as part of the planning application to inform its determination. This will be tested using an economic viability assessment toolkit which will examine specific site viability, based on 'open book' information relating to the costs and values of that particular development that explains and justifies any departures from standard development costs. Further guidance is provided in Policy IMPL1: Developer contributions.

Residential accommodation for older people

6.23 The resident population of the Plan Area is ageing and living longer, and the number of people aged 75 and over is projected to increase by 65% (12,800) in the Plan period, and by 2036 almost half the Plan Area population is projected to be aged 55 and over. The majority of older residents will continue to live in mainstream housing. Many will prefer to remain in their existing homes and to live independently for as long as they are able to. New technologies and in-home care may help them to do so.

6.24 Whilst turnover in and renewal of the existing stock of specialist older persons accommodation will help to meet some future needs, there remains a significant need to provide new specialist accommodation during the Local Plan period, especially for the very elderly. Based on national prevalence rates of health and other factors affecting the ability of local residents to live independently, homes designed to be suitable for the changing needs of older people, including sheltered and extra care housing may need to comprise around a fifth of the new homes provided in the Plan period. Whilst this figure is best treated as indicative, such provision can help local people to continue to live independently in more suitable accommodation if they wish to, freeing up existing family houses for others. Some homes designed to meet the needs of older people are also likely to be suitable for households with impaired mobility or some other specialist care needs.

6.25 There are around 1,600 care home bed spaces in the Plan Area, sufficient in quantitative terms to meet the needs of the current population, and to accommodate needs in the first five years of the Plan period (based on national prevalence rates). However, the current models of care home service provision and funding appear likely to change in the near future. Accordingly, in the first five years of the Plan period the highest priorities in providing specialist accommodation for older people are:

  • to increase the level of self-contained extra care housing units that provide a higher level of support to enable continued independent living; and
  • to encourage the renewal or replacement of general residential care home stock to better serve more specialised and intensive support needs, such as providing dementia care or end-of-life hospices.

6.26 In the medium to longer term the growth in population aged 75+, and in particular aged 85+, will generate need for additional care home bed spaces including specialised nursing homes58 that address specific local needs not met by existing facilities.

Policy HOU3: Residential accommodation for older people

The strategy is to enable older people to continue to live independently by:

  • Taking a positive and flexible approach to the adaption of homes where it would enable the occupier to continue to live independently, or for the occupier to accommodate a friend or family member requiring care;
  • Ensuring that new homes are built to standards that are capable of adaption to meet the future needs of older people and others with care needs; and
  • Ensuring that new housing provision includes housing types designed to be suitable for older people.

Care homes (Use Class C2) for older people and others will be supported on sites in existing care home use, and in other locations suitable for residential use provided that there is an identifiable local need for registered care provision that cannot reasonably be met by existing care home facilities in the Local Plan sub-area.

Supporting text

6.27 Where specialist self-contained accommodation for older people is provided, it will be important to ensure that residents benefit from a high level of amenity and shared community spaces to encourage companionship and social activities whilst enabling residents to live independently as far as possible. For example, by ensuring the development is located close to local facilities and services and includes information technology such as high speed broadband to enable remote access to support and services. Specialist older persons' accommodation should also include features such as level access without steps, increased storage including for mobility vehicles, a ground floor bath/shower room, a guest bedroom for visiting family, stairwells that can accommodate a stair lift and low maintenance garden areas with outdoor seating. See Policy IMPL2: Development standards for accessibility requirements.

6.28 On-site provision of affordable housing will be sought on sheltered and extra care housing schemes, also in the form of sheltered and extra care housing, having regard to the viability implications of any communal or care facilities and services provided. Care homes (Use Class C2)

6.29 Given the limited supply of land suitable for residential use in the Plan Area, it is not appropriate to accommodate wider market demand for commercial care home development if it does not specifically address a local need not met by existing facilities in the Plan Area. Where care home development is proposed based on meeting specific local needs, an operator commitment to provide residential care to clients referred by the District Council or Hampshire County Council will be given positive weight.

6.30 Exceptions will be made where primarily self-contained retirement housing developments, include an element of residential care accommodation to provide full care to residents who may need it on a short-term basis before returning to independent living, or to ease the transition to more specialised forms of care when appropriate.

6.31 Affordable housing contributions will not be sought for residential care homes that fall within Use Class C2.

Gypsies, travellers and travelling showpeople

6.32 There are historic links between gypsies and the New Forest area. Gypsies and travellers make up a small but higher-than-average proportion of the Plan Area population. National policy is to ensure fair and equal treatment for travellers, in a way that facilitates the traditional and nomadic way of life while respecting the interests of the settled community.

6.33 The Hampshire Consortium Gypsy, Traveller and Travelling Showpeople Accommodation Assessment (GTAA, May 2017) indicates a confirmed need in the Plan Area as follows:

  • One additional permanent pitch for gypsies and travellers, arising after 2031;
  • Current need for four plots for travelling showpeople; and that
  • Some additional needs may arise from traveller households that did not participate in the assessment survey.

Policy HOU4: Gypsies, travellers and travelling showpeople

Needs for gypsy and traveller pitches and for plots for travelling showpeople, who continue to live a travelling lifestyle, will be met by existing planning permissions, site allocations and a combination of the following:

i. Regularising and/or permitting extensions to existing sites in appropriate locations;

ii. Permitting applications for new traveller pitches or showpeople plots in appropriate locations for residential development;

iii. Addressing any remaining unmet needs through the Local Plan Review Part Two, in consultation with travelling communities.

Supporting text

6.34 Saved Policy TOT10 of the Local Plan Part 2 (2014) allocates land at Little Testwood Farm for traveller pitches. It has capacity for around eight new pitches.

6.35 The needs of travellers who no longer live a travelling lifestyle will be accommodated within existing housing allocations. Development proposals for those who no longer travel but wish to live in a culturally specific form of accommodation will also be assessed using the criteria set out in part (ii) of the policy. General restrictions on residential development in the open countryside, including in the Green Belt, apply equally to travellers, but where in accordance with Policy HOU5: Rural housing exception sites and community-led housing schemes proposals may be considered in appropriate locations as a form of selfbuild housing or as a rural housing exception site.

6.36 The requirements of Policy ENV1: Mitigating the impact of development on International Nature Conservation sites apply to traveller sites.

Rural housing exception sites and community-led housing schemes

6.37 In accordance with Policy STR3: The strategy for locating new development, residential development is not normally permitted in the countryside i.e. outside settlement boundaries. However problems of access to affordable housing are often greatest in the rural parts of the Plan Area, and as a consequence local people, particularly the young, may have no alternative but to leave their community to find housing.

6.38 To address these issues the Council will make an exception to controls on development outside settlement boundaries to permit new, small-scale housing development, subject to strict criteria to ensure that it meets an identified local affordable housing need which would not otherwise be met.

6.39 As a potential delivery mechanism the Council is supportive of a community-led approach, where communities identify and address the housing needs of their own community locally. Community-led housing is housing designed and managed by local people and built by or for them to meet the needs of their community on a not for private profit basis. The community-led housing group may acquire land by purchase (by the community), or by gift. The homes can be rented or sold to local people at rates that remain affordable, or sold to create income for the benefit of the community.

Policy HOU5: Rural housing exception sites and community-led housing schemes

New residential development will only be permitted on suitable sites outside the defined settlement boundaries where it is to meet an identified need of local people for affordable housing to meet local needs which cannot be provided in any other way. The Council will support and encourage housing, and other ancillary or related development proposed alongside housing, by a qualifying Community-led Housing group on land it owns or controls, where the development has the support of the local community and is proposed to meet the identified local needs of the community it relates to. Suitable sites will be located within or adjoining a settlement which either provides a range of local services and facilities, or is (or can be made) safely accessible to a larger settlement nearby which provides a wider range of services and facilities. The District Council will work with local communities to identify suitable sites, which may also be identified through Neighbourhood Plans. Legal undertakings or other appropriate mechanisms will be required to ensure that the benefits of the scheme to the local area and/or specified community group are clearly defined and legally protected in perpetuity.

Supporting text

6.40 Rural housing exception sites should be supported in principle by the relevant town or parish council and the local community based on a housing needs assessment including the following information:

i. The present housing circumstances and income levels of those considered to be in need; related to local house prices and rent levels;

ii. The connection of the likely occupants with the village or nearby village; and

iii. The type and size of dwellings that would meet their requirements (which may include including self-build housing). 6.41 Occupancy will be restricted to local people in a manner that should be clearly defined, and will usually mean someone who lives or works in, or who has strong family connections with, the settlement or parish in which the scheme is proposed.

6.42 Exception sites to meet the needs of more isolated rural communities will tend to be more reliant upon access by car, but should include measures to improve safe access by foot and cycle wherever practicable.

6.43 Community-led housing is based on the following core principles. Groups that can demonstrate that they meet these principles will comply with the policy:

i. Meaningful community engagement throughout the process, including community participation in making the key decisions about what should be built and for whom;

ii. Once developed, the local community group or organisation owns, manages or stewards the homes and in a manner of their choosing;

iii. A requirement that the benefits of the scheme to the local area and/or specified community group are clearly defined and legally protected in perpetuity.

6.44 Community Land Trusts (CLT) are a form of community-led housing. The Localism Act 2011 enables CLTs to bring forward development through a Community Right to Build Order backed by community support in a referendum, as well as by the standard planning application process.

6.45. Binding arrangements must be made to ensure that the housing provided will be managed and made available specifically to meet the identified local housing needs, and will remain affordable for both current and future occupiers. The precise nature of these arrangements may vary but will most often be achieved through a legal agreement.

Saved Policies

6.46. The following Saved Policies may also be relevant:

- Saved Policy DM20: Residential development in the countryside

- Saved Policy DM21: Agricultural or forestry workers dwellings

7. Business and the economy

Employment land and development

7.1 As set out in Policy STR6: Sustainable economic growth, the use and reuse of existing employment sites, in combination with additional employment land provision within Strategic Site Allocations, is sufficient to meet identified employment needs over the Plan period.

7.2 Local Plan employment objectives will therefore be met in part by making effective use and re-use of existing employment sites, to help maintain a sufficient supply of employment land and premises to meet future needs in suitable locations.

7.3 To accommodate any additional or operator-specific employment needs that may arise, this policy also provides criteria facilitating and supporting suitable new employment development in other environmentally appropriate locations, subject to appropriate controls.

Policy ECON1: Employment land and development

i. Proposals for the development, redevelopment or intensification of employment uses will be supported on existing employment sites, and on other suitable sites within defined town centre boundaries, provided that:

a. Safe and suitable access can be provided for pedestrians, cyclists and for the types of vehicles likely to visit the site; and

b. The proposal would not unacceptably impact on the environment, the landscape, or on the amenity of nearby residents; and

c. The proposal would not have a significant detrimental impact on the operation of other businesses in the locality; and

d. the use proposed is proportionate in scale for the location with regard to the settlement hierarchy ii. In other parts of the built-up areas of settlements not in current employment use, employment uses will be supported provided that, in addition to meeting criteria (a) - (d):

e. The use proposed is small-scale and would not generate levels of noise, visitor numbers or traffic movements materially higher than those of residential use, especially outside of normal working hours.

iii. Outside of built-up area boundaries and areas covered by site-specific policies, new employment development will be considered where, in addition to meeting criteria (a), (b) and (c):

f. The proposal is in accordance with Saved Policy CS21 Rural Economy; or

g. To enable the establishment or growth of a high value-added or knowledge-based business proposal that can demonstrate a specific need for the location and that it would have a low environmental impact.

Supporting text

7.4 Employment sites comprise land in or last in employment use, or with a Local Plan allocation or planning permission for employment use (including where the planning permission is lapsed or subject to a legal agreement which has not been completed).

7.5 Employment uses comprise: industrial, office, business, storage and distribution uses falling within classes B1, B2 and B8 of the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 as amended, and 'sui generis' uses of a similar character.

7.6 High value-added or knowledge-based business employment activities are defined in the glossary at Appendix B, and to be of low impact are likely to be predominantly office-based activities of a professional, financial, digital and information technology, management, consultancy, design, creative or similar nature. They may also involve light industrial activities that are not reliant on either or both of, daily HGV movements or production processes that could generate levels of noise or emissions likely to cause amenity disturbance beyond the site curtilage, or to cause environmental harm.

7.7 In applying the policy criterion (g) proposals should first consider any alternative employment sites and premises in whichever of the three sub-areas of the Plan Area the operator is seeking to locate in. Proposals of 2,500 sqm gross internal area or more should additionally consider alternative sites and premises in the full Plan Area. Evidence that specific operational needs can only be met by the location proposed will be taken into account.

7.8 Planning conditions or other appropriate measures will be applied to employment developments in a manner proportionate to the sensitivity of the location, if and where they are necessary to ensure that an employment use does not have an unacceptably adverse impact on the environment, highways and pedestrian safety, residential amenity or the operations of existing businesses. These measures may include but are not limited to: hours of operation, timing and routeing of heavy goods vehicles, and the control of discharges and emissions including noise and light (if not already controlled or licensed by other bodies).

Retention of employment sites

7.9 In addition to supporting appropriate new employment development, Local Plan employment objectives will in part be met by ensuring that existing suitable and viable employment sites in the Plan Area are retained wherever possible. The Government has introduced a range of permitted development rights (Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015 and the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) (Amendment) Order 2016) that allow for greater flexibility of change of use. These include rights that will impact on existing employment uses, by allowing some commercial, office, light industrial, storage/ distribution and agricultural premises to be converted to housing without the need for a formal planning permission to establish the change of use.

7.10 The Business Needs and Commercial Property Market Assessment states that the commercial market in the Plan Area for business, industrial and distribution uses is characterised by rising take-up, reducing availability and low levels of vacancy. The majority of employment sites and premises provide valuable local employment opportunities and accommodation for local businesses in the Plan Area, which should be retained wherever possible.

7.11 Employment sites or premises that are no longer attractive to potential employment occupiers in their current state, or are not capable of being made so through redevelopment, are better considered for alternative uses to ensure the efficient use of previously developed land. Suitable opportunities for redevelopment or change of use will be identified in the Brownfield Land Register, updated annually.

Policy ECON2: Retention of employment sites and consideration of alternative uses

Employment sites that remain suitable for employment use will be retained for continued employment use wherever possible. Other uses that require planning permission will be supported provided that:

i. The primary purpose of the use is to provide a supporting service to businesses or to the workforce in the local area; or

ii. For other non-employment uses, it is demonstrated that the employment site is no longer suitable or viable for continued employment use, by submission of proportionate evidence showing that:

a. The condition of the site or building renders it unsuitable for its present or any other realistic and appropriate employment use, and it would not be viable to refurbish or redevelop the site for an alternative employment use; and/or

b. The site has been actively but unsuccessfully marketed for employment use on unrestricted terms fair to potential occupiers and at a realistic price, for a minimum period of twelve consecutive months prior to the date at which the planning application for an alternative use was submitted.

And in addition to either (i) or (ii)

iii. The alternative use would not have a significant detrimental impact on the operation of other businesses in the local area.

Supporting text

7.12 Policy ECON2 seeks to retain existing employment sites and premises in employment use wherever it is it is reasonable and possible to do so. Given the extent of permitted development rights, a marketing period of twelve months for sites that do not benefit from permitted development rights will help to ensure that employment re-use and re-development options are properly tested and not unduly affected by short-term market fluctuations. Marketing should include notices visible to passing traffic at the site location, and advertisements in relevant commercial property press (including online press). The property should be offered at a price commensurate with its condition, location and permitted use, and without restrictions that would unreasonably limit its attractiveness to potential occupiers. Marketing evidence should document all these details and provide a log of enquiries and offers made by potential occupiers.

7.13 The policy identifies that certain types of alternative use are acceptable on employment sites without meeting the requirements of criterion (ii). Such uses can help to make business sites more attractive to incoming firms and can improve the quality of the working environment for employees. Supporting services may include crèche facilities, training, meetings space and conference facilities, restaurants/ cafes, recreation and sports facilities, and medical facilities. The policy test that will be applied is whether their primary purpose is to provide a supporting service to businesses or to the workforce in the locality, rather than servicing general demand or passing trade.

7.14 Proposals for other non-employment uses that require planning permission on existing employment sites will only be considered where the site marketing criteria in this policy have been met, unless there are other significant and specific material considerations in the public or local community interest for the alternative use in the location proposed, and these considerations outweigh the employment objectives of this policy.

Port development

The Port of Southampton and Dibden Bay

7.15 The international deep-sea gateway Port of Southampton is of national and international economic importance and plays a central role in the economy of southern Hampshire. The main landside operational area is located within the City of Southampton, but the port operator Associated British Ports (ABP) owns a significant land holding within New Forest District at Dibden Bay.

7.16 Dibden Bay adjoins the New Forest National Park. The reclaimed land area is designated the Dibden Bay Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). The Dibden Bay foreshore is part of the Hythe to Calshot SSSI, forming part of the Solent and Southampton Water Special Protection Area (SPA) and Ramsar site.

7.17 In their Draft Port of Southampton Master Plan (2016) ABP conclude from trade and shipping volume forecasts that the Port of Southampton will need to grow within the lifetime of this Local Plan. The master plan indicated ABP's intention to seek consent for port expansion onto Dibden Bay and that they are likely to make an application for a Development Consent Order (DCO) for port use at Dibden Bay during the lifespan of this Local Plan. It is common ground between ABP and the District Council that ABP land at Dibden Bay is the only area of land physically capable of accommodating a significant expansion of the Port of Southampton.

7.18 A future application for port use at Dibden Bay would be likely to be of a scale that would qualify as a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project (NSIP) under the 2008 Planning Act and thereby require an application to be submitted for a Development Consent Order. It would fall to the Planning Inspectorate rather than the District Council to consider a NSIP for port development and to make a recommendation to the Secretary of State whether a Development Consent Order should be made.

7.19 In considering a NSIP application for port development, the decision maker would first consider whether the proposal is in accordance with relevant national policy, including that for ports. If in accordance with government policy objectives, the decision maker would then weigh the suggested benefits, including the economic benefits and the contribution that the scheme may make to the national, regional or more local need for the proposed infrastructure, against anticipated adverse impacts, including cumulative impacts.

7.20 In cases where nationally significant infrastructure development would affect a protected habitat, and in the absence of alternative solutions, the decision-maker may need to consider whether there are any imperative reasons of overriding public interest (IROPI) in allowing the development to proceed.

7.21 The Secretary of State would make the final decision whether or not to issue consent. In the event that a Development Consent Order is made by the Secretary of State, it would most likely fall to the District Council to discharge any requirements imposed in the Order (broadly equivalent to planning conditions).

Marchwood Port

7.22 Marchwood Port has been used as a sea mounting centre for the movement of troops and equipment since 1943, and is also extensively used as a berth by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary in support of the Royal Navy. The port was identified and safeguarded for port and port-related use in the previous Local Plan.

7.23 In 2017 the Ministry of Defence awarded Solent Gateway a 35-year concession to manage the military movements through the port whilst also opening the site for commercial port use. The landside area benefits from an active railhead and lies to the north of Dibden Bay. The site and its foreshore have no international or national ecological designations, but it is adjacent to the designated SSSI, SPA and Ramsar sites covering Dibden Bay and its foreshore. Any proposal would therefore need to demonstrate in a Habitats Regulations Assessment of the proposal that it would not have an adverse effect on the integrity of any International Nature Conservation sites, including on the adjacent Solent and Southampton Water SPA and Ramsar site. The site also abuts smaller locally designated Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation (SINC).

The role of the Local Plan in relation to port development

7.24 Marchwood Port is an established facility and the Local Plan needs to consider its additional potential now that it is also available for commercial as well as military use (see Policy ECON3: Marchwood Port).

7.25 The position in relation to Dibden Bay as a site for potential future port expansion is very different to the position in relation to Marchwood Port. Given that the scale of port development envisaged by the landowner at Dibden Bay is likely to be nationally significant, it is not appropriate for the Local Plan itself to take a position on the merits or otherwise of proposed port development. These are matters for the NSIP process.

7.26 In relation to potential nationally significant infrastructure projects, it is the appropriate role of the local planning authority to seek the best outcome for the District and in particular for directly affected communities, if significant port development is consented. As part of the examination of a NSIP the Council would submit a Local Impact Report to the examiner, giving details of the likely positive and negative impacts of the proposed development on the local area and its communities (see Policy ECON4: Port Development at Dibden Bay).

7.27 Matters a local impact report would need to address are set out in Figure 7.2 below Policies ECON3 and ECON4.

Other Local Plan considerations

7.28 Both the Marchwood Port site and ABP land holdings at Dibden Bay include significant land areas, respectively about 90 and 400 hectares that could accommodate a wide range of supporting uses and infrastructure (subject to obtaining the necessary consents). ABP also own large parts of the Marchwood Industrial Estate to the north of Marchwood Port. At this early stage there is no clearly identifiable need to make further land allocations for supporting development, infrastructure or consequential economic or other growth.

7.29 Hythe and Dibden Parish is a designated area for Neighbourhood Plan-making purposes.

7.30 In the event that a consent for port use at Dibden Bay is given, the Council will initiate a review of the Local Plan in whole or in part to address the implications of major port expansion, including wider engagement with the Partnership for South Hampshire, Hampshire County Council and other relevant parties through the Duty to Cooperate (or equivalent future bodies and mechanisms) to address strategic and cross boundary implications.

Policy ECON3: Marchwood Port

Land at Marchwood Port (as defined on the Policies Map and illustrated in Figure 7.1) is safeguarded for port and port-related uses. The Council will work co-operatively with the operators to enable the effective and efficient use of the site and port facility for commercial, economic and local employment generating purposes whilst:

i. Ensuring the effective functioning of the transport network including new highway provision or improvements if required;

ii. Avoiding where possible and mitigating where necessary any harmful impacts on the environment;

iii. Avoiding unacceptable impacts on the local communities and the health, safety and amenity of local residents, including from air pollution, noise, light or other disturbance from operational activity, road and freight movements; and

iv. Minimising where possible and mitigating where necessary adverse impacts on the wider countryside and landscape, including the New Forest National Park.

Any non-port-related proposals must be compatible with the port and portrelated activity and not prejudice the effective utilisation of the port and rail facilities of the site.

Should proposals reach the scale to trigger the NSIP process, the Council will prepare a Local Impact Report to address the matters (i) - (iv) above as part of addressing the Local Impact Report considerations set out in Figure 7.2.

 

Policy ECON4: Port development at Dibden Bay

If a Development Consent Order is sought for port operations in the Dibden Bay area (as identified on the Policies Map and illustrated in Figure 7.1) the Council will work to seek the best outcome for the District and directly affected communities. This will be achieved by preparing a Local Impact Report addressing the matters identified in Figure 7.2 to set out the likely impact of the proposed development on the District and its communities, and for any negative impacts to identify how and to what extent they may be resolved, mitigated or compensated for. In the event a Development Consent Order for port use at Dibden Bay is made by the Secretary of State, the Council will give particular weight to the following considerations in determining subsequent planning applications or in discharging any conditional requirements imposed in the Order, insofar as the issues or impacts arising are additional to those already considered in the Development Consent Order process:

i. improving local business and employment opportunities;

ii. ensuring the effective functioning of the transport network including new highway provision or improvements if required;

iii. avoiding where possible and mitigating where necessary any harmful impacts on the environment;

iv. avoiding unacceptable impacts on the local community and the health, safety and amenity of local residents, including from air pollution, noise, light or other disturbance from operational activity, road and freight movements; and

v. minimising where possible and mitigating where necessary adverse impacts on the wider countryside and landscape, including the New Forest National Park.

Supporting text to Policies ECON3 and ECON4

7.31 Proposals which make effective use of the port rail connection for freight movement, with appropriate regard to residential amenity, will be encouraged. This includes the potential for a future rail freight connection to Dibden Bay, which should not be precluded or sterilised by development at Marchwood Port unless shown to be unnecessary or unachievable on technical or viability grounds.

7.32 If a Development Consent Order is sought for port operations at Dibden Bay or Marchwood Port the Council would seek and expect to work through the Local Impact Report issues with the port development promoter prior to submission of the application for development consent, and would seek to agree potential solutions or establish common ground where possible. As part of this process the Council would also seek to work collaboratively with all relevant port, transport and local authorities to ensure that freight movements and the logistics/operations of port access are directly managed to minimise the impact on the highway network, local communities and the environment.

7.33 The Hampshire County Council Waterside Interim Transport Policy is that any port-related freight vehicles should be accommodated through the most direct route avoiding traffic generation on routes through residential areas, gaining access to the M27 at junction 2 via the A326.

7.34 Development proposals will require a development-specific Habitats Regulations Assessment.

Icon for pdf Figure 7.1: Dibden Bay general area [1.19MB]

Figure 7.2: Matters to be addressed in a Local Impact Report on proposals for a nationally significant scale of port development in the Solent waterside
  • The extent to which the proposals are consistent with national and local policies.
  • The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 in terms of the likely direct, cumulative and in-combination effects of construction and operation of a port on International Nature Conservation sites: the Solent and Southampton Water Ramsar Site and SPA, on the Solent Maritime SAC, and on the New Forest SPA, SAC and Ramsar Site.
  • The likely positive or negative effects of the construction and operation of a port facility on the following matters, taking into account proposed mitigation, compensatory measures or potential planning conditions.

a. the amenity of local residents and communities including noise and light pollution

b. the capacity and safe and efficient operation of the transport network including by road, rail, ferry, walking and cycling

c. landscape character including significant views and the statutory duty of regard to the purposes of the New Forest National Park

d. air quality in the District and wider area, with particular regard to Air Quality Management Areas/Clean Air Zone, human health, and in-combination effects on International Nature Conservation sites

e. marine water quality, the marine environment and effects on the foreshore including from ship wash

f. the local environment, wildlife, ecology and habitats

g. the local economy and employment including impacts on local businesses (including tourism) and local employment opportunities

h. the housing market and local housing supply, including the implications of demand for workforce accommodation in both construction and operational phases

i. infrastructure and utilities' capacity including community facilities and services

j. flood risk and other climatic factors

k. soil and fresh water bodies

l. architectural and archaeological heritage

m. green infrastructure, recreation and open space including public access to the coast.

Retail development and other main town centre uses

7.35 The main towns within the Plan Area of Totton, Hythe Village, Lymington, New Milton, Ringwood and Fordingbridge provide a good range of services and facilities and local employment opportunities for the communities living within and around them. Whilst vibrant and healthy, they tend to focus on local markets and the dayto-day needs of residents and visitors.

7.36 The preceding decade has been one of significant change for retailing and town centres, including significant sub-regional retail consolidation to larger centres and the ongoing growth of online retailing and related branch restructuring by retail chains. The Plan Area is also served for higher order retail, cultural and commercial leisure activities by the nearby sub-regional centres of Southampton, Bournemouth and Salisbury. Theoretical need for additional retail provision identified in the Core Strategy (2009) has not materialised. Market interest leading to or seeking opportunities for major development in the Plan Review period and preceding decade has been limited to a few small supermarkets.

7.37 In this context the Local Plan takes a flexible approach, setting a framework to respond positively to future interest or demand if it arises. The aim of the policy is to ensure that the town centres within the District remain the focal points for new investment in retail and commercial facilities to maintain and enhance their roles and the services they provide to their communities and to visitors. There is current interest led by locally based investors in the renewal of parts of New Milton town centre, which is being addressed by the New Milton Neighbourhood Plan.

Policy ECON5: Retail development and other main town centre uses

The strategy is to support the renewal of and investment in town centres and large villages by applying a 'town centres first' approach in determining development proposals for retailing and the other Main Town Centre Uses, as defined in the supporting text.

i. Development proposals for the Main Town Centre Uses will be favourably considered on environmentally appropriate sites in the settlements identified in Policy STR4: The settlement hierarchy provided that:

a. The proposal is consistent with the scale and function of settlement in accordance with Policy STR4: The settlement hierarchy; and

b. The site is within a defined shopping frontage, other appropriate commercial location within the Town Centre boundaries defined on the Policies Map, or will form part of a community hub provided as part of a Strategic Site Allocation; and where necessary the proposed scale and location of development is justified by the application of the sequential test.

ii. Other than as set out in Saved Policy CS21: Rural economy or in the Site Allocation Policies, development proposals for Main Town Centre Uses will only be supported in more peripheral locations within or outside defined built-up area boundaries where supported by robust evidence submitted at planning application stage to demonstrate that:

a. There is a local need and no suitable town centre or edge-of-town centre sites that are available to address that need; and

b. The location is, or will be made, accessible by a choice of transport modes including safe and convenient pedestrian and cycle access; and

c. That there would be no significant adverse impact on the vitality and viability of town centres and large villages.

Supporting text

7.38 The main town centre uses are as defined in Annex 2 of the National Planning Policy Framework: retail development (including warehouse clubs and factory outlet centres), leisure, entertainment facilities, more intensive sport and recreation uses (including cinemas, restaurants, drive-through restaurants, bars and pubs, night-clubs, casinos, health and fitness centres, indoor bowling centres and bingo halls), offices; and arts, culture and tourism development (including theatres, museums, galleries and concert halls, hotels and conference facilities). Development includes redevelopment and change of use.

7.39 As set out in this policy, proposals for new retail and other main town centre uses should satisfy the requirements of the sequential test where necessary. The sequential test applies to planning applications for main town centre uses that are not in an existing centre and are not in accordance with an up-to-date Local Plan (NPPF 2012 paragraph 24, NPPF 2019 paragraph 89). Applications for main town centre uses (other than smaller scale facilities meeting rural or localised needs) should be located in town centres, then in edge of centre locations and only if suitable sites are not available should out of centre sites be considered.

7.40 Outside of town centre boundaries, retail development proposals of over 1,000sqm Gross Internal Area (GIA) will be subject to an impact assessment. In the villages and in locations outside of the defined built-up areas, retail development proposals over 500sqm GIA will be subject to an impact assessment.

Primary, secondary and local shopping frontages

7.41 In response to changing high streets and retail markets the Government has expanded the scope of permitted development rights, enabling more flexibility and changes of use in shopping areas and town centres without the need for planning permission. This policy sets out how changes of use that are not permitted development will be managed.

7.42 The Policies Map defines the 'Primary Shopping Area' for the town centres of Totton, Hythe, Lymington, New Milton, Ringwood and Fordingbridge. Primary and Secondary Frontages are defined in towns, and Local Shopping Frontages are also defined elsewhere in most towns and large villages.

Policy ECON6: Primary, secondary and local shopping frontages

i. Within the designated Primary Shopping Frontages, proposals for the change of use of ground floor shops (Class A1) and financial and professional services premises (Class A2) to other uses that require planning permission or are subject to Prior Approval, will only be supported where it will not create a concentration of non-shopping uses and result in an unacceptable change in the retail character of the shopping frontage as a whole.

ii. Within the designated Secondary Shopping Frontages, proposals for changes of use of ground floor shops (Class A1) and financial and professional services premises (Class A2) to other uses which require planning permission or are subject to Prior Approval will be supported provided that they would not have an adverse impact on the vitality and viability of the shopping frontage as a whole.

iii. Within the designated Local Shopping Frontages

a. Uses which provide for the day-to-day shopping and service needs of the area will be permitted.

b. The loss of an occupied shop or service use (within Use Class A1) that provides for everyday community needs will only be acceptable if evidence is provided of active and comprehensive marketing of the site for its current use for a minimum of 12 months prior to the submission of a planning application, which demonstrates the existing use is not commercially sustainable.

Supporting text

7.43 The aim of the policy is to strike an appropriate balance between responding to market demand and changing circumstances on the one hand, and the need to ensure that wherever possible settlement centres and shopping parades remain active, viable, and provide a healthy level of shopping facilities and services conveniently accessible to surrounding residential areas. Local shopping areas provide a focal point for community life and their convenience and accessibility are especially important for less mobile residents including the elderly and those without access to private transport.

Saved Policies

7.44 The following Saved Policies may also be relevant:

- Saved Policy CS19: Tourism

- Saved Policy CS21: Rural economy

- Saved Policy DM11: Sites for marine-related businesses and access to the water

- Saved Policy DM12: Maintaining access to the water

- Saved Policy DM13: Tourism and visitor facilities

- Saved Policy DM16: Within town centres, outside Primary Shopping Areas and Secondary Shopping Frontages

- Saved Policy DM19: Small local shops and public houses

- Saved Policy DM22: Employment development in the countryside

- Saved Policy DM23: Shops, services and community facilities in rural areas

- Saved Policy DM24: Loss of rural employment sites, shops, public houses and community facilities

- Saved Policy DM25: Recreational uses in the countryside - including horsekeeping/riding

8. Community safety and climate change

8.1 The Local Plan aims to create places that are safe and healthy to live in now and that will remain so in the future. This chapter addresses the community safety aspects of natural processes including those arising from climate change, as well as the implications of industrial and other developments and installations. Policy ENV3: Design quality and local distinctiveness addresses safety and security within developments though the masterplanning and design process.

Safe and healthy communities

8.2 This policy seeks to ensure that new development is appropriately managed or controlled where it poses or exacerbates environmental or other safety risks to communities, and that existing health and safety risk factors are avoided wherever possible in affected or sensitive locations, or minimised where development is necessary. A range of health and safety risk factors have been considered in identifying the Strategic Sites allocated in this Local Plan.

8.3 Parts of the Plan Area are affected by or at risk of fluvial, ground or surface water flooding, sea level rise and coastal erosion with links to climate change. Flood risk is addressed in the section following this policy.

8.4 The Plan Area, and in particular the Totton and the Waterside sub-area, also contains a range of infrastructure, installations and industries that could give rise to various forms of pollution (including noise), or which involve the use of hazardous substances or explosives covered by specific regulatory regimes. These include the Fawley oil refinery complex, major gas and oil pipelines, and military installations. Within the consultation areas around these installations, the development potential of land may be constrained especially for uses with vulnerable occupants such as children or care home residents.

8.5 Modelling shows that traffic emissions may reach or exceed recommended thresholds for human health in the Plan period in a small number of locations near the M27 north of Totton and near the A31 at Ringwood. Development in the Plan Area may also have implications in relation to an existing Air Quality Management Area in Lyndhurst in the New Forest National Park, and to the Clean Air Zone that is being established in Southampton to tackle traffic-related exceedance of air quality limits for human health in the city centre and around the port and its main access routes.

8.6 All of the Plan Area lies in either or both of the aerodrome safeguarding consultation zones for Bournemouth and Southampton airports. Whilst not a constraint on most forms or types of development, the airport operator must be consulted in relation to relevant proposals within the identified safeguarding zones.

Policy CCC1: Safe and healthy communities

i. Development should not result in pollution or hazards which prejudice the health and safety of communities and their environments, including air quality and the water environment. Where necessary to enable development to take place, appropriate measures will be required to prevent, control, mitigate or offset the impacts or risks of development on community health and safety.

ii. When the opportunity arises, particularly through development or redevelopment, remedial measures will be taken to address existing pollution or hazards which prejudice the health and safety of communities and their environments.

iii. Development within the safeguarding area of a military explosives storage area or within the consultation zones of a hazardous industrial site or pipelines will be restricted or managed either in accordance with Health and Safety Executive guidelines, or in consultation with the Secretary of State for Defence, as applicable.

iv. In the interests of public safety, vulnerable developments will not be permitted

a. Within the defined Coastal Change Management Area at Barton-onSea to Milford-on-Sea unless in accordance with Saved Policy DM6: Coastal Change Management Areas;

b. In areas at risk of flooding unless in accordance with the sequential and exceptions tests;

c. On contaminated, polluted or unstable land unless it is first adequately remediated or otherwise made safe for the proposed use and for the local community prior to occupation.

Supporting text

8.7 The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is a statutory consultee for planning applications around major hazard sites and pipelines and on applications for hazardous substances consent. The HSE has identified inner, middle and outer consultation zones around major potential hazard sites or installations, and provides guidance on appropriate development within the three consultation zones, taking into account the nature of the risk posed, and the scale of potential exposure to that risk (based on the scale of development and the relative vulnerability of potential occupiers). In very general terms most forms of major residential development in the inner and middle HSE consultations zones would not be in accordance with HSE advice, and development with more vulnerable occupiers e.g. care homes would not be in accordance with HSE advice in any of the consultation zones. Similar arrangements apply around locations where the military may store explosives.

8.8 An Air Quality Assessment is likely to be needed for development that would:

  • Significantly affect traffic congestion, speed or volume (especially HGV volume) during construction or operation; 
  • Introduce new point sources of air pollution (including dust during construction);
  • Expose future occupiers to existing sources of air pollutants;
  • Affect International Nature Conservation sites or biodiversity especially by deposition or concentration of pollutants.

8.9 Site promoters are recommended to contact the Council's Environmental Health team to confirm whether an Air Quality Assessment is likely to be needed in support of a future planning application.

Flood risk

8.10 Significant parts of the Plan Area face some level of flood risk. Areas at risk include low-lying land near the coast and around water courses (including rivers, streams and the feeder streams, drains and ditches that flow into them), and areas affected by rainwater surface run-off. Maps of areas at risk of marine, fluvial and surface water flooding are maintained on a Government website and periodically updated by the Environment Agency. These maps take into account flood modelling work undertaken in the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA) prepared to inform the Local Plan Review.

8.11 Climate change will increase the extent and degree of flood risk over the Plan period and in the longer term, as a consequence of rising sea levels and more extreme weather events. These effects are modelled in the SFRA. In addition the geology of the Plan Area includes underlying chalk and gravel. Groundwater may exacerbate fluvial flooding or present additional risks of surface water flooding, especially when the water table is elevated in prolonged wet periods.

8.12 To address flooding risks the Council will apply national policy (NPPF 20212 paragraph 93 to 108, NPPF 2019 paragraph 155 - 165) to ensure that flood risk is taken into account at all stages in the planning process. The Sequential Test will be applied to direct new development to areas with the lowest probability of current and future flooding, and to control and avoid inappropriate development in areas at current or future risk from flooding.

8.13 The Exception Test will be applied to consider proposals that it is not possible to locate in areas of lower flood risk, taking into account any wider benefits of the development proposal, and safety consideration on- and off-site. Appropriate flood warning and evacuation plans are a SFRA requirement for any sites at risk of flooding where development is allocated or permitted in accordance with the flooding Exception Test.

8.14 In considering potential or proposed locations for development it is therefore important that, as far as reasonably possible, development is located where the risk of flooding (from all sources) is and will remain lowest, taking account of climate change and the vulnerability of future uses to flood risk. The Flood Risk Vulnerability Classification in National Planning Policy Guidance identifies 'Highly vulnerable' and 'more vulnerable' uses that are least appropriate to locate in flood risk areas. These include emergency service stations, mobile home parks, caravans, hospitals, residential institutions and housing. Where appropriate the Strategic Site Allocation Policies provide site-specific guidelines for managing, minimising or mitigating flood risk, informed by the SFRA.

8.15 It is equally important that where development can safely take place in areas prone to flooding, that it does not worsen flood risk elsewhere, and that opportunities presented by development to reduce existing flood risks are taken. Where proposed development would resolve or significantly reduce existing risks of flooding or drainage network overload this will be accorded significant positive weight in determining the planning application. In accordance with Policy ENV3: Design quality and local distinctiveness the use of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) will be sought wherever they would be effective in reducing the risks of flooding including by drainage network overload.

Safe and sustainable travel

8.16 Safe site access and the impact of new development on the capacity and safety of the transport network are important planning considerations, as is the need to encourage and enable more sustainable means of travel including walking and cycling, to reduce reliance on private vehicles. Walking and cycling will be promoted by ensuring all development has safe and convenient links to existing and proposed pedestrian and cycle routes including those on adjacent developments.

8.17 This policy addresses how new development is accessed including parking and servicing arrangements, and how the development is connected to the road network, public transport services, footpaths and cycle ways. New development may also provide opportunities to deliver improvements to the transport network, to improve access and the ease or convenience of movement, and to install or improve communications systems that may reduce the need to travel.

Policy CCC2: Safe and sustainable travel

New development will be required to:

i. Prioritise the provision of safe and convenient pedestrian access within developments, by linking to and enabling the provision of more extensive walking networks wherever possible, and where needed by providing new pedestrian connections to local facilities;

ii. Provide or contribute to the provision of dedicated cycle routes and cycle lanes, linking to and enabling the provision of more extensive cycle networks and providing safe cycle routes to local schools wherever possible;

iii. Consider and wherever possible minimise the impact of development on bridleways and horse riders;

iv. Provide sufficient car and cycle parking, including secure cycle parking in schools and colleges, work places, bus and rail stations, and in shopping areas in accordance with the adopted Parking Standards Supplementary Planning Document;

v. Incorporate infrastructure to support the use of electric vehicles; and

vi. Provide, or contribute proportionately to the provision of, any highways or public transport measures necessary to enable the development to be accommodated in a safe and sustainable manner, including the requirements identified in any applicable Strategic Site Allocation Policies

Supporting text

Access and connectivity

8.18 New development must accord with Government and Highway Authority design guidance related to road safety, and safe and convenient access for pedestrians and cyclists are paramount.

8.19 Preparation of a Transport Assessment will be required where a proposed development will or is likely to generate significant vehicle movements, or to affect pedestrian, cyclist or road safety. The Transport Assessment must demonstrate that the impact of the development on the transport network is acceptable, or how any unacceptable impacts or risks will be satisfactorily controlled or mitigated.

8.20 The Strategic Site Allocation Policies set out site-specific requirements for sustainable transport measures identified to be necessary to support the proposed development. Wherever footpath, pedestrian and cycle routes run alongside or through the site, there is a presumption that these routes will be retained and improved by the development.

8.21 Site-specific Transport Assessments may identify that additional measures are necessary. Developer contributions will be sought where they are necessary and reasonably required to improve pedestrian and cycle routes, or to support or provide public transport services.

8.22 Where a development Transport Assessment identifies a need for mitigation measures to manage or reduce vehicle movements, a Travel Plan will be required setting out practicable measures to promote and encourage sustainable travel including walking and cycling.

Parking

8.23 Proposed parking in new developments will be assessed in relation to the Council's adopted Parking Standards Supplementary Planning Document, which alongside Policy IMPL2: Development standards includes a requirement for the provision of electric car charging points.

8.24 It is important to ensure that a realistic and sufficient level of vehicle and cycle parking is provided where new development takes place. The availability of sufficient car parking has a role in improving accessibility to necessary local services and facilities, particularly in rural areas and for the less mobile including people with disabilities. Equally it is important to approach parking requirements and standards with some flexibility to ensure land is used efficiently, having regard to existing parking provision, the realistic needs arising from the proposed development, and the accessibility of the location by other travel modes.

8.25 Where developments are large enough to include on-site parking, parking provision must be addressed as an integral part of the design and site masterplanning process. Where on-street parking is relied upon in whole or part, streets should either be designed to accommodate likely demand (if the site is large enough), or it should first be demonstrated that existing on-street parking capacity is sufficient to meet likely current and future needs. In such schemes, on-street electric car charging points should be provided.

8.26 Traffic Regulation Orders will be applied where necessary or desirable to regulate the speed, weight, movement and parking of vehicles, or to regulate pedestrian access.

8.27 Where necessary, measures will be put in place to ensure that communal or public parking areas are managed efficiently and effectively for the primary benefit of the car park's intended users. This may include considering how on-street parking will be managed and maintained if the Highways Authority does not wish to adopt the street.

Saved Policies

8.28 The following Saved Policies may also be relevant:

- Saved Policy DM4: Renewable and low carbon energy generation

- Saved Policy DM5: Contaminated land

- Saved Policy DM6: Coastal Change Management Area

- Saved Policy DM7: Restrictions on new soakaways

- Saved Policy DM26: Development generating significant freight movement

9. Implementation

Developer contributions

9.1 New development often creates a need for new or improved infrastructure and community facilities without which the development could have a detrimental impact upon amenity, safety or the environment. Development can also help to achieve the objectives of the plan, for example by providing affordable housing, a coherent footpath and cycleway network and improvements to the environment.

9.2 Policy STR8: Community services, infrastructure and facilities sets out the strategy to secure or enable provision of the infrastructure and community services and facilities that are needed in the Plan Area. This policy sets out the mechanisms for securing appropriate contributions from developers to meet the needs arising from their developments, or to mitigate its impact on existing infrastructure, facilities and services.

9.3 It is important to understand the limitations of the planning system in relation to infrastructure provision. National policy is that planning obligations, such as to require developer contributions for infrastructure, should only be placed on developers where they are necessary to make the development acceptable in planning terms, and they must also be directly related to the development, and fair and reasonable in scale and kind. For a development impact to be 'acceptable in planning terms' does not mean that the current situation must be improved upon or made no worse, and it is not the role of developer contributions to make up historic deficiencies - these are the responsibility of the infrastructure provider and beyond the scope of the planning system.

Policy IMPL1: Developer contributions

All developments must provide, or contribute proportionately to the provision of, any on-site and off-site infrastructure, facilities, affordable housing, public open space and habitat mitigation measures that are necessary and reasonably required to support the development and mitigate its impacts to achieve a sustainable development.

Where the development is part of a larger site, the developer will be expected to demonstrate how the provision of infrastructure and services for the application area forms a coherent part of a comprehensive solution for the site as a whole, and how the proposal can be delivered without prejudicing the development of the site as a whole.

In exceptional circumstances where it is demonstrated in a robust and independently tested viability study that there are previously unidentified cost considerations that render development unviable, the Council will work with the applicant to explore options to restore viability in the following order of preference. The starting position is that there will be a proportionate reduction in returns to the developer and land owner for any reduction in developer contributions agreed, within acceptable margins of profitability relative to development risk.

i. Varying the development proposal if development costs could be reduced without unacceptably compromising design quality or sustainability.

ii. Where it is possible, phase or defer the required contributions in whole or part, including by the use of Grampian planning conditions.

iii. Vary, reduce or remove contributions that would have the least impact on the achievement of sustainable development.

As last resort development that would be unsustainable without the inclusion of necessary but unfunded infrastructure, facilities, affordable housing, public open space or recreational mitigation, will be refused planning permission.

Supporting text

9.4 The mechanism to secure developer contributions will depend on the type of infrastructure and the site circumstances, as set out within the Infrastructure Delivery Plan for requirements currently identified to be needed.

9.5 The methods for collecting contributions from developers include the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) (or future equivalent), Section 106 and Section 278 legal agreements. The Council will prepare an Infrastructure Funding Statement annually to set out how infrastructure projects will be funded in accordance with the CIL Regulations 2010 (as amended) or future equivalent.

9.6 Where Section 106 Legal agreements are used, they will be drafted by the Council (Section 278 agreements are drafted by Hampshire County Council as Highway Authority). The developer will be responsible for the costs resulting from administering the agreement. For developments that appear likely to take place over an extended period or to evolve over time, planning agreements will include formulae or other appropriate mechanisms to ensure flexibility for changing circumstances, so that the appropriate contribution will be made when the details of the development are finalised without the need to re-negotiate the agreement.

9.7 A CIL or Section 106 contribution may be made 'in kind', by the direct provision of the necessary facilities or project by the developer. Where the contributions required are published as standard charges, reasonable allowance will be made for any on- or off-site provision in kind that will be made by the developer, and for any existing infrastructure capacity.

9.8 In some circumstances larger sites may be owned or developed by more than one developer, or brought forward in more than one planning application. Where this is the case for a Strategic Site Allocation, the various developers will be expected to collaborate on the provision of the infrastructure and facilities which are needed to serve them all, preferably through equalisation agreements where their proportionate impacts and costs are fairly reconciled in advance of making planning applications.

9.9 Equalisation agreements may also be needed where several land parcels in a larger site all rely on infrastructure that will be provided off-site, or will be provided on one of the land parcels towards which the other land parcels will need to contribute.

9.10 The Council will have regard to the viability of development. It is expected that policy requirements and related costs arising from the Local Plan and its supporting documents will already have been taken into account in land transactions, which should not therefore be based on unreasonable or over-optimistic assumptions regarding the type and density of development or the extent of planning obligations. The relevant supporting documents include (but are not limited to) the Infrastructure Delivery Plan, Supplementary Planning Documents including the Mitigation for Recreational Impacts SPD the Community Infrastructure Levy or future equivalent, and forthcoming guidance on developer contributions. Viability testing has demonstrated that housing development is likely to be viable in the Plan Area taking into account the known or likely costs of meeting the policy requirements of this Local Plan and its supporting documents. This work has included discussions with infrastructure and service providers to establish the likely development costs that would be borne by the Strategic Site Allocations, as set out in the Infrastructure Delivery Plan.

Development standards

9.11 National Building Regulations now address many aspects of the efficiency, sustainability and quality of development previously addressed by the planning system. There remain particular areas where higher standards can and should be applied where they are justified.

9.12 As set out in Policy HOU3: Residential accommodation for older people, the population aged 75+ is projected to grow 65% (12,800) in the Plan period, and by 2036 almost half the Plan Area population is projected to be aged 55 and over. The number of residents with a long-term disability or mobility limiting medical condition will increase commensurately. Suitably designed accommodation of the appropriate accessibility standards will be required to meet their needs.

9.13 The Plan Area is within a wider area designated by the Environment Agency as being under serious water stress, where demand for water must be effectively managed. Parts of the Plan Area are also in a Clean Air Zone and traffic emissions affect both human health and International Nature Conservation sites.

Policy IMPL2: Development standards New development will meet or exceed the following standards and requirements81 to help minimise their environmental impact and/or to be adaptable to the future needs of occupiers over their lifetime. i. Visitable Dwellings standards of Part M4(1) of the Building Regulations except for Sheltered and Extra Care homes which should be built to the Wheelchair Adaptable Dwelling standard of Part M4(3)2a of the Building Regulations. ii. The higher water use efficiency standard in accordance with Part 36(2) (b) of the Building Regulations, currently a maximum use of 110 litres per person per day. iii. New commercial developments of 250 - 999 sqm gross internal area (GIA) are required to achieve Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) excellent standard in the water consumption criterion. Commercial development of 1,000 sqm or more GIA is also required to achieve BREEAM excellent standard overall. v. Provision of a high speed fibre broadband connection to the property threshold. vi. Provision to enable the convenient installation of charging points for electric vehicles in residential properties and in residential, employee and visitor parking areas.

Policy IMPL2: Development standards

New development will meet or exceed the following standards and requirements to help minimise their environmental impact and/or to be adaptable to the future needs of occupiers over their lifetime.

i. Visitable Dwellings standards of Part M4(1) of the Building Regulations except for Sheltered and Extra Care homes which should be built to the Wheelchair Adaptable Dwelling standard of Part M4(3)2a of the Building Regulations.

ii. The higher water use efficiency standard in accordance with Part 36(2) (b) of the Building Regulations, currently a maximum use of 110 litres per person per day.

iii. New commercial developments of 250 - 999 sqm gross internal area (GIA) are required to achieve Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) excellent standard in the water consumption criterion. Commercial development of 1,000 sqm or more GIA is also required to achieve BREEAM excellent standard overall.

v. Provision of a high speed fibre broadband connection to the property threshold.

vi. Provision to enable the convenient installation of charging points for electric vehicles in residential properties and in residential, employee and visitor parking areas.

Or their successors if updated or replaced
Supporting Text

Visitable dwellings

9.14 New development must comply with the latest mandatory national standards for access. As at spring 2020, these are the Visitable Dwelling standard as set out in the Building Regulations Approved Document M: Volume 1- Dwellings part M4(1).

9.15 For sheltered and extra care housing, the requirements of M4(3)2a of the Building Regulations should be provided in all circumstances. Water efficiency standards

9.16 The higher water use efficiency Building Regulations standard is applied to all residential development in the Plan Area. Further efficiencies are encouraged, and Southern Water seeks to achieve a higher efficiency standard of 100 litres per person per day by 2040 to manage demand in Hampshire (affecting the Totton and the Waterside sub-area). For commercial buildings the national BREEAM standard provides an equivalent mechanism for water efficiency, and a wider benchmark including other measures of environmental performance and sustainable construction.

9.17 The Council is also adopting the most efficient water use standard partly due to the potential risk of adverse impacts from water abstraction for the River Itchen SAC, and to reduce wastewater discharge that may adversely affect the River Avon SAC by increasing phosphorus levels or concentrations.

Telecommunications

9.18 Development should provide digital communications infrastructure, including superfast broadband, as an integral requirement for new homes and business premises. The Government recognises that reliable broadband internet access is essential for homes throughout the country to benefit from online services, including future opportunities to provide remote social, health and care services that may help to support independent living, as well as potentially reducing the need to travel for employment purposes (with air quality benefits). Appropriate, universal and future-proofed infrastructure should be installed and utilised. The Building Regulations already address telecommunications provision within new buildings, but there is a need to ensure that sites are provided with a high quality connection to an exchange with superfast broadband capacity wherever practicable.

Electric car charging points

9.19 Electric and hybrid vehicles are important emerging technologies essential to achieve the national commitment to phase out new combustion engines by 2040. The provision of electric vehicle (EV) charging points within all new developments will also support the early take up of electric vehicles in the Plan Area, helping to reduce the level of traffic emissions and their adverse effects on human health and sensitive habitats.

9.20 The success of electric and hybrid vehicles as technologies is partly dependent on there being a readily available supply of vehicle charging points. In accordance with national planning policy, new developments should be designed to enable the provision of plug-in charging points for electric and hybrid vehicles.

9.21 Within all dedicated off-street parking spaces that are within the curtilage of a dwelling, the minimum requirement is the installation within the parking space of a dedicated fast charging (With at least a 32 amp single phase power supply, or any subsequent higher minimum standard adopted nationally) unit. In new developments where communal parking areas are provided, or where private parking is separate from the premises or dwelling, an electrical supply should be installed with sufficient power capacity to enable the convenient installation of fast charging points to all parking spaces in the future, without the need for significant re-wiring, structural or subsurface works. Some charging points should be provided unless it is demonstrably unfeasible to do so.

9.22 With continuing development in technology, new developments should install the latest method of charging that is accepted as an industry standard and cost effective for general use.

Monitoring the Local Plan

9.23 This policy sets out how the Local Plan 2016-2036 Part One: Planning Strategy will be monitored. Monitoring is important to ensure that the strategic objectives are being achieved, including that planned growth is being delivered in a timely manner.

9.24 The Council will update progress in an Annual Monitoring Report. If monitoring demonstrates that Local Plan targets are not being met appropriate action will be taken.

Policy IMPL3: Monitoring

The Council will monitor the implementation of the Local Plan 2016-2036 Part One using the Strategic Objective monitoring framework set out in Figure 9.1. If the strategic objectives of the Local Plan are not being achieved, including where planned development is not being delivered in a timely manner, the Council will investigate the reasons why and take appropriate action.

Depending on the scale and nature of the objective or delivery target not being met, actions may include:

i. Engagement with the relevant parties including developers, landowners, service and infrastructure providers and other relevant parties to identify barriers or obstacles to the achievement of a Local Plan objective, or to the timely delivery of a planned development, and how they can be resolved;

ii. The preparation of a position statement, development brief or action plan where it would assist delivery;

iii. If possible, the identification of alternative sustainable and deliverable sites that are in general accordance with the Spatial Strategy through the Local Plan 2016-2036 Part 2, Neighbourhood Plans or other appropriate mechanism;

And if necessary:

iv. Undertaking a partial or full early review of the Local Plan for New Forest District (outside of the National Park), including if required discussions with neighbouring local planning authorities about the capacity of their Plan Areas to meet any unmet needs arising from this Plan Area.

Figure 9.1: Local Plan Strategic Objective Monitoring Framework

Targets

Monitoring Indicators

SO1: Landscape and the countryside:To safeguard and where possible enhance the special qualities and landscape character of the Plan Area including the Cranbourne Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Solent coastline. To provide an appropriate gateway to and setting for the adjoining New Forest National Park. To maintain and enhance the South West Hampshire Green Belt and to protect locally valued views and landscapes. To facilitate enjoyment of and access to the coast and countryside. To conserve, manage and enhance the setting of heritage assets.

Policies addressing SO1:STR1,2,3,4, ENV2, ENV4

Data sources:NFDC planning applications data

A. To protect the Green Belt and the AONB

•    Number and site area of any permissions and refusals for inappropriate development in (i) Green Belt and (ii) AONB

B. To protect the appearance and special character of the countryside and landscape of the Plan Area and of the adjoining New Forest National Park

•    Development proposals refused due to adverse impact on (i) the landscape and countryside and/or (ii) the New Forest National Park

•    Development proposals approved despite significant adverse impact on the landscape or the countryside that cannot be adequately mitigated

•    The percentage (number, area or length) of woodland blocks, TPO trees and protected hedgerows retained or lost within Strategic Site Allocations or on other developments of 50+ homes

SO2: Biodiversity and environmental quality:To safeguard and improve biodiversity, and the protection and enhancement of wildlife, species, habitats and water bodies in the Plan Area. To avoid where possible or fully mitigate where necessary, the direct and cumulative impacts of development on designated nature conservation sites. To promote the understanding of and care for the natural environment; managing recreational pressures in sensitive locations. To manage and where possible reduce or mitigate activities that unacceptably impact on air quality or levels of noise, dust, odour or light pollution.

Policies addressing SO2:STR1,2,3,4, ENV1, Saved Policy DM2

Data sources:NFDC planning applications data, NFDC mitigation schemes and mitigations schemes that include NFDC, Natural England SSSI Monitoring and Reporting.

A.  To protect areas designated for their habitat or wildlife value, including from inappropriate development

B.  To ensure that development provides appropriately located natural recreational greenspace to mitigate recreation impacts on the New Forest SPA and SAC

C.  To ensure that other impacts on international nature conservation sites are adequately mitigated (air quality, water quality, Solent recreation)

D.  To manage and where possible reduce or mitigate activities that unacceptably impact on the environment or human health, avoiding sensitive uses in locations subject to existing hazards

•    Proportion of priority habitats within SSSIs which are in favourable condition

•    Area protected by (i) national or international and (ii) local nature conservation designations

•    Permissions and refusals for development that would have a significant adverse impact that cannot be  adequately mitigated on an international, national or locally designated nature conservation site

•    Area of recreational natural greenspace provided on sites of 50+ homes

•    Developer financial contributions for the mitigation of recreational impact secured from sites of under 50 homes

•    Progress with the delivery of off-site mitigation projects identified in the Mitigation for Recreational Impacts SPD

•    Developer financial contributions secured for the monitoring, management or mitigation of other impacts on international nature conservation sites

•    Applications for new homes, commercial or community premises on unallocated sites in an inner or middle HSE consultation zone that are (i) approved contrary to HSE advice, or (ii) refused

•    Development applications (i) approved or (ii) refused on unallocated sites in refused on basis of hazard zones/hazardous substances

 

Targets

Monitoring Indicators

SO3: Built environment and heritage:To provide a high quality, safe and attractive living and working environments in our towns, villages and rural areas. To ensure that valued local character and distinctiveness is maintained, that new development is well-designed and is appropriate in scale, density, form and character to its context and landscape setting. To conserve, manage and where possible enhance listed buildings and other built heritage assets.

Policies addressing SO3:STR1,3,4, ENV2, ENV3, IMPL2, Saved Policy DM1

Data sources:NFDC applications data

A. To protect the heritage and character of the built environment the Plan Area

•    Development proposals refused due to poor design, adverse impact on local character, and/or adverse impact on a heritage asset or its setting

•    Development proposals approved despite poor design, or despite a significant adverse impact that cannot be adequately mitigated on local character and/or on a heritage asset or its setting

•    Heritage assets in the Plan Area recorded on the Historic England Heritage at Risk Register

SO4: Housing provision:To provide at least 10,420 additional homes within the Plan Area 2016-2036 to help meet the needs of the district within the Southampton, Bournemouth and Salisbury housing market areas directing larger scale provision to the main towns and larger villages.

Policies addressing SO4:STR1,3,4,5, Site policies SS1 - SS18

Data sources:HCC/NFDC annual completions monitoring

A.  To deliver at least 10,420 dwellings over the Plan period 2016-2036

B.  To provide a five year housing land supply of deliverable sites

•    Housing Trajectory published annually recording (i) dwellings completed in preceding year(s) (ii) available and deliverable housing supply, and (iii) the five year housing land supply position

SO5: Housing needs, mix and affordability:To provide a range and choice of good quality new homes by type, size, tenure and location. To ensure that new housing provision as far as possible addresses local housing needs providing in particular homes more affordable for younger households and a wider spectrum of homes and other measures enabling older residents to continue to live and remain independent in their New Forest communities.

Policies addressing SO5:STR1,3,4, HOU1,2,3,4,5, Site policies SS1 - SS18

Data sources:NFDC applications data including CIL relief applications, HCC/NFDC annual completions monitoring, Housing needs and market assessment studies

A. To ensure all planning permissions for housing sites of 11 or more dwellings provide affordable housing in accordance with Policy HOU2

•    Gross affordable housing permissions as a percentage of all total homes permitted on sites of (i) 11-49 homes and (ii) 50+ homes

•    Gross affordable housing completions as a percentage of all completions

B. To provide a mix of homes by type and size addressing the needs of both older and younger households

•    Percentage of 1-2 bedroom homes permitted on Strategic Site Allocations

•    The number of sheltered or extra care homes permitted on sites of more than 10 homes or units.

•    Net additional gypsy and traveller pitches permitted

•    Net additional self and custom build plots provided

 

Targets

Monitoring Indicators

SO6: Economic opportunity:To facilitate a healthy and growing economy operating within environmental limits and to maximise the benefits to local communities from significant new development. To support economic growth that reflects and complements the District's specific qualities and advantages, in particular low impact tourism, knowledge- based enterprises and marine industries. To improve the supply of flexible, modern premises micro- and start-up businesses need to establish and grow locally. To support and promote measures that enable local residents and employees to access and take up local employment opportunities including to improve their skills and knowledge required, and enabling services such as childcare provision.

Policies addressing SO6:STR1,3,4,5,6, ECON1,2,3,4, Site policies SS1, SS4, SS14

Data sources:NFDC applications data, HCC/NFDC annual completions monitoring

A.  To ensure a sufficient supply of land and premises for employment uses

B.  To existing retain existing employment sites that remain suitable for continued employment use or re-use

•   Area of suitable and available employment land suitable for B-class uses

•   Floorspace or land area (i) permitted and (ii) completed for B Class employment development, by main type or use category

•   Area of previously identified suitable and available employment land granted planning permission for non B-class uses

SO7: Vibrant and sustainable towns and villages:To maintain the economic vitality and viability of town centres. In the main towns to aim for a good range of facilities providing for the social, cultural, entertainment, economic, shopping, leisure, community, health and educational needs of all sections of the local community. In villages to maintain and enable local retail and service provision to meet day-to day needs in rural areas.

Policies addressing SO7:STR1,3,4, ECON5-6

Data sources:NFDC applications data, HCC/NFDC annual completions monitoring, NFDC Town Centres and Shop Survey

A. To maintain healthy vibrant town centres and shopping frontages

•    Floorspace or land area (i) permitted and (ii) completed for retailing and other main town centre uses, by main type or use category

•    Town centre uses of 500sqm GIA or more permitted or refused outside of the settlement boundaries of the defined main towns and large villages

•    Premises vacancy rates and usage mix in defined shopping frontages

SO8: Rural areas and tourism:To promote a positive future for rural areas and to help secure their economic prosperity and social well-being by supporting farming and traditional commoning practices including back-up grazing, agricultural and rural enterprise, tourism and the diversification of the rural economy in ways which are compatible with environmental and landscape objectives.

Policies addressing SO8:STR1,3,4, HOU5, Saved Policies CS19, CS21

Data sources:NFDC applications data

A. To support the economic prosperity and social well- being or rural areas

•    The number of affordable homes provided in rural areas, including rural worker accommodation

•    The number of applications approved and refused for employment, tourism, community or service facilities in rural area

 

Targets

Monitoring Indicators

SO9: Climate change and environmental sustainability:To improve the resilience of local communities to climate change, including managing the risks of flooding and coastal erosion. To prioritise the beneficial re-use of previously developed land and to promote the use of renewable resource and energy sources within sustainable limits. To manage and where possible reduce vehicular emissions and other local factors contributing to climate change or that degrade sensitive environments or quality of life.

Policies addressing SO9:STR1,3,4,9 CCC1, IMPL2, Saved Policies DM4, DM6

Data sources:NFDC applications data

A. To improve the resilience of local communities to climate change, including managing the risks of flooding and coastal erosion

•    Applications for new homes, commercial or community premises on unallocated sites in flood risk zones 2 or 3, or in a coastal change management area that are (i) approved contrary to Environment Agency advice, or (ii) refused

B. To make efficient use of resources and to reduce harmful emissions or impacts related to development

•    The number of homes permitted on previously developed land

•    The number of applications for residential development permitted that (i) do or (ii) no not achieve higher water efficiency standards or have access to an EV charging point

•    New commercial floorspace that (i) does (ii) does not achieve BREAAM excellent standard (premises of 250sqm+ GIA)

SO10: Infrastructure provision and sustainable access to opportunities and facilities:To secure provision of the social and physical infrastructure necessary to manage the impact of new development on existing services and communities. To enable participation by all age groups in active recreation to facilitate healthy lifestyles, by providing

public open space and opportunities for leisure, sport and informal recreation. To improve safe access to opportunities, services and facilities that enable a fulfilling life including by walking, cycling and where viable by enhancements to public transport services.

Policies addressing SO10:STR1, 7, 8, CCC2, IMPL1, Saved Policies CS7, DM26

Data sources:NFDC applications data including developer contributions data, NFDC open space records.

A. To maintain healthy vibrant town centres and shopping frontages

•    Floorspace or land area (i) permitted and (ii) completed for retailing and other main town centre uses, by main type or use category

•    Town centre uses of 500sqm GIA or more permitted or refused outside of the settlement boundaries of the defined main towns and large villages

•    Premises vacancy rates and usage mix in defined shopping frontages

B. To prevent the loss without replacement of existing public open space

•    Percentage of designated public open space retained or lost

C. To ensure that development is supported by the necessary infrastructure and community services

•    Applications approved for (i) gain or (ii) loss of, a community facility (health, education, community centres, childcare uses)

•    The extent to which development permitted on Strategic Site Allocation Sites provides (or contributes proportionately to the provision of) the infrastructure and community facilities identified to be necessary in the Infrastructure Delivery Plan

 

Strategic Site Allocations

9.25 The Strategic Site Allocations address the majority of future housing needs not already being met by sites with planning permission or already allocated for housing development.

9.26 The Local Plan should be read as a whole. Development proposals for the Strategic Site Allocations will be assessed against the applicable Strategic Site Allocation policy and all other relevant policies in this Local Plan, including relevant Saved Policies. Planning applications for the Strategic Site Allocations should also have regard to, and contribute towards, the policies and objectives of any adopted Neighbourhood Plans, Supplementary Planning Documents and Local Distinctiveness guides that are relevant to the site location.

9.27 The larger site allocation boundaries may include some existing dwellings that have not been promoted for redevelopment. There is no presumption or requirement that they would form part of a future development, but this would be acceptable in principle subject to meeting the requirements of this policy, and any policies relevant to the property itself e.g. if it has heritage asset status.

Infrastructure Delivery Plan

9.28 The Site Allocation Policies set out the main site-specific requirements for the provision of the infrastructure and services necessary to sustainably accommodate the planned growth. More detail is provided in the Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP). The IDP is a live document that identifies the types of infrastructure required to support the delivery of the Local Plan, based on consultations with infrastructure and service providers. It includes information about the capacity and constraints of existing infrastructure and potential sources of funding, where known. Masterplanning and design

9.29 Site Concept Master Plans have been prepared for each Strategic Site Allocation to demonstrate how the identified minimum number of homes can be accommodated in a manner compliant with the Local Plan policy requirements and standards, including the provision of natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation and the provision of public open space, and the development setbacks required:- around pipelines and overhead power lines, and to protect specific habitats, water courses, mature trees and woodlands.

9.30 The Site Concept Master Plans are illustrative rather than prescriptive requirements. Informed by a landscape assessment and consideration of biodiversity potential, they illustrate how development can fit its landscape (or townscape) context and deliver a net environmental gain (subject to appropriate detailing and implementation). The achievement of a net environmental gain is a national policy objective in its own right, and forms an important part of addressing Habitat Regulations requirements, and fulfilling the Council's legal Duty of Regard to the purposes and objectives of the New Forest National Park. The layouts and details of development proposals will be subject to further consideration and discussion as sites come forward through the planning application process, including in pre-application discussions.

Site capacity

9.31 The stated capacity of the Strategic Site Allocations is based on masterplanning work carried out by the Council in consultation with site promoters and in full accordance with Local Plan policy requirements, including the provision of natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation, open space provision and housing mix.

9.32 The Strategic Site Allocation Policies express the site housing capacity as a minimum requirement. Achievement of the stated site capacity may be dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided, especially on smaller and more constrained sites. This will be tested in detail at planning application stage.

9.33 At the detailed site design stage site promoters may be able to demonstrate that more homes can be delivered whilst still meeting the requirements of the Local Plan and the Habitats Regulations. Where added capacity can be delivered in a manner that is well-designed and contextually appropriate, provides an acceptable housing mix, fully mitigates its habitat impacts and achieves a net environmental gain, additional capacity will be supported.

Recommended material to support planning applications

9.34 An Environmental Impact Assessment and a Habitats Regulations Assessment are likely to be required in support of development proposals on all of the Strategic Sites. As part of this process, the Environmental Statement must identify, describe and assess the following factors including the interactions between them:

  • Population and human health
  • Biodiversity
  • Land, soil water and climate
  • Material assets, cultural heritage and the landscape

9.35 Planning applications will need to include the mandatory supporting documentation specified in the national and local mandatory lists, where they are relevant to the proposed development. These are likely to include some or all of the following:

  • Design and access statement
  • Air quality assessment
  • Biodiversity survey and report
  • Flood Risk Assessment
  • Heritage statement
  • Land contamination assessment
  • Lighting assessment
  • Transport assessment
  • Travel plan 
  • Tree assessment
  • Any other information or evidence identified by the Strategic Site Allocation Policies

Coordinated development

9.36 To ensure that the development of Strategic Site Allocations delivers high quality new communities making the most effective use of the land available it is important that development is delivered in a manner that connects and integrates development phases. A framework master plan should be prepared for the site as a whole to guide and coordinate detailed consideration of development phases, and to demonstrate how early phases will form part of a coordinated whole.

9.37 Development proposals that do not follow the approach illustrated in the Site Concept Master Plans set out in the Strategic Site Allocation Policies will need to include their own master plan that demonstrates from first principles how the requirements of the Strategic Site Allocation Policy can be met in full and would deliver net environmental gain and a high quality design that is appropriate to its context and landscape setting.

9.38 Applications for the piecemeal development of smaller parts of larger strategic sites are unlikely to meet the requirements of a Strategic Site Allocation policy unless they clearly demonstrate:

i. How they form part of a coherent overall scheme in design terms, based on either the Strategic Site Allocation Policy Site Concept Master Plan, or on an alternative master plan for the site as a whole. Jointly prepared master plan frameworks or Design and Access Statements, and equalisation arrangements for the provision of infrastructure and services and land for habitat mitigation that are agreed with the other site interests will help to demonstrate a coordinated approach.

ii. That access arrangements for the application site are coherent for the strategic site as a whole, and will be permeable in relation to access and movement for the site as a whole, including for road traffic, without the imposition of ransom strips; and

iii. How the site would make a proportionate contribution to the facilities, services, infrastructure, open space and recreational habitat mitigation requirements of the allocation site as a whole. This may necessitate the provision of land for, and must not prejudice the delivery and implementation of, the infrastructure, facilities, open space and habitat mitigation that is necessary for the Strategic Site Allocation as a whole as well as for the development site itself.

Implementation

9.39 The Council will work closely with developers and the community to deliver on site the high quality schemes required. Pre-application advice and Planning Performance Agreements will be a central part of how new development is delivered, as will monitoring implementation to ensure that quality outcomes are delivered.

9.40 Regulations require that pre-commencement planning conditions can only be used where agreed by the applicant. Consequently more detail will need to be provided about development proposals at the point of application in general, and in particular about landscaping and open space provision, to enable planning decisions to be made. The Council's 1APP Planning Application Requirements will set out all the relevant supporting documents and information required, as identified in the Local Plan and its supporting SPD, to ensure they are provided when an application is submitted.

9.41 After planning permissions are issued the Council will closely monitor development on site to ensure that approved details are implemented and any other requirements are adhered to. Where issues of compliance are identified these will be discussed with the developer to agree how compliance will be achieved. If necessary appropriate action will be taken to enforce compliance.

Strategic Site 1: Land to the north of Totton

i. Land to the north of Totton, as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential-led mixed use development and open space and will comprise the following:

  • At least 1,000 homes, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.
  • A commercial core west of Pauletts Lane including around five hectares of land for business and employment uses.
  • A community focal point in a prominent location including ground floor premises suitable for community use.
  • Contributions to educational provision to include two hectares of land to be reserved for a primary school.
  • On-site provision of formal public open space.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a well-designed and integrated extension to Totton whilst maintaining the rural character of Hill Street and Pauletts Lane and a countryside edge to the New Forest National Park. Development will be required to:

a. Create an integrated network of natural green spaces to frame development, using and enhancing important tree belts, hedgerows and woodland blocks (including Bog Plantation, Hatton's Plantation and Kilnyard Copse), and by making a positive feature of water courses, to connect new greenspace to existing footpaths and rights of way to Loperwood, Sharveshill Plantation, Wade Hill Drove and Testwood Lakes.

b Set development behind the ridgeline on the northern and northwestern edges to maintain an open landscape and an appropriate westbound transition from urban Southampton to the countryside edge of the New Forest National Park.

c Provide traffic calming and crossing points for the A36 (Salisbury Road) and creating a choice of vehicular routes including an alternative route west of Pauletts Lane between the A36 and Loperwood suitable for two-way traffic including buses, and an eastwest pedestrian and cycle route across Pauletts Lane.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. The need for an agreed comprehensive development framework for the whole allocation to ensure the effective coordination between multiple land interests to deliver an integrated, whole-site approach to the provision of access, community facilities, open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation.

b. Design and other appropriate measures to mitigate potential noise and air quality impacts from the M27/A31, A36 and the A326.

c. To assess the need for, and to provide where necessary, enhancements to the A326 and A36 junctions to provide safe vehicular access for the development.

d. The Grade II listed building Broadmoor Cottage, Pauletts Lane should be retained within an appropriate setting so that its significance can be appreciated.

e. The preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) will be required which would demonstrate that there will be no inappropriate development within Flood Zone 3b.

Supporting text

9.42 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.43 The site is divided by Salisbury Road. Based on indicative masterplanning of the main land parcels on a stand-alone basis, land to the north can accommodate at least 260 homes. The land to the south is divided by Pauletts Lane, which will deliver at least 330 homes to the west and at least 230 homes to the east. Land south of Loperwood has outline planning permission for up to 80 homes. Through a coordinated approach the site is expected to achieve 'at least' 1,000 home total capacity.

9.44 The site allocation boundary includes some existing residential properties that have not been promoted for redevelopment. There is no presumption or requirement that they would form part of a future development, but this would be acceptable in principle subject to meeting the requirements of this policy, and any policies relevant to the property itself e.g. if it has heritage asset status.

9.45 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site include:

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application. Unless confirmed in writing to be unnecessary by Hampshire County Council, two hectares of land will be reserved on-site for a new primary school in a location that is conveniently walkable from both the development and the adjacent settlement
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • A capacity appraisal of the sewage network and enhancements to sewer capacity if required, which will need to match the rate of development.

Schools

9.46 Based on a capacity of 1,000 homes, Hampshire County Council preference is for extensions to existing primary schools rather than provision of a new school, subject to technical confirmation that expansion is feasible and deliverable. If a new school is required, then the land and the necessary contributions to help to deliver the school will be sought. If a new school is not required, then developer contributions will be sought to extend or add temporary classrooms at Calmore Infant and Junior schools and another local schools, and the school reserve site can be released for additional residential development.

Formal open space (sports pitches)

9.47 Provision of formal public open space at north Totton should include two multi-use games areas, and there is a need for a cricket pitch in the area.

Minerals

9.48 The site contains pockets of land within a Hampshire Minerals Consultation Area. Minerals extraction may be appropriate where environmentally suitable subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource.

Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.49 The Flood Risk Assessment should be informed by the outputs of the SFRA Level 2 and the latest Climate Change requirements to ensure development is safe and that there is no increase in flood risk elsewhere over the lifetime of the development.

Nutrient management

9.50 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water international conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 1: Land to the north of Totton [7.84MB]

Strategic Site 2: Land south of Bury Road, Marchwood

i. Land north-west of Marchwood as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development and public open space and will comprise the following:

  • At least 700 homes in the Plan period, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided, and around 300 additional homes in the future on land currently occupied by a solar array.
  • A community focal point in a prominent location in the southern part of the site including ground floor premises suitable for community use.
  • Contributions to educational provision to include two hectares of land to be reserved for a primary school.
  • On-site provision of formal public open space.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan. Development will be required to deliver a well-designed and well-connected extension to Marchwood including a new countryside edge that reinforces the settlement gap between Totton and Eling, by:

a. Creating green corridors running from the woodlands towards the coast and to buffer the railway line incorporating amenity and play areas, natural recreational greenspace, streets, footpaths, existing water courses and features to manage surface water flood risk.

b. Providing a primary access route through the site using the existing mineral working road connecting to a new spur off the lower Bury Road roundabout, with secondary access points off Tavell's Lane.

c. Creating a transition in character from a suburban core nearer to Marchwood, to a lower density built form appropriate to the settlement and countryside edge that incorporates more public open space, natural greenspace and planting.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Phasing and masterplanning of development to deliver a comprehensive and integrated development over time.

b. Assessment of the need for, and where necessary, provision of enhancements to Bury Road, Marchwood Road and their connection to the A326 to ensure safe and suitable vehicular, cycle and pedestrian access for the development.

c. Design or other appropriate measures if required, to mitigate potential odour impacts from Slowhill Copse Wastewater Treatment Works, in consultation with Southern Water.

d. The preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) demonstrating that there will be no development within areas of Flood Zone 3b and how the proposed development will be made safe over its lifetime. e. Design or other appropriate measures in any new development to minimise and mitigate the effects of potential noise and light impacts generated by the Port of Southampton on residential amenities.

Supporting text

9.51 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.52 The northern part of the site is in active use for aggregates extraction, expected to be completed by 2025. The southern part of the site includes a solar farm with planning permission to 2026.

9.53 The development layout set out in the Concept Master Plan includes the required setbacks for a major gas pipeline running along the eastern side of the site and across the northern end of the site, and for electricity pylons crossing the site. The western site boundary is a railway line.

9.54 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site include:

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application. Unless confirmed in writing to be unnecessary by Hampshire County Council, two hectares of land will be reserved on site for a new primary school in a location that is conveniently walkable from both the development and the adjacent settlement
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • A capacity appraisal of the sewage network and enhancements to sewer capacity if required, which will need to match the rate of development
  • Site-specific bird surveys will be required to confirm their contribution to incombination loss of supporting habitat to internationally designated species and to be mitigated as required

Primary schools

9.55 Based on a capacity of 700 homes during the Plan period up to 2036, Hampshire County Council preference is for extensions to existing primary schools rather than provision of a new school, subject to technical confirmation that expansion is feasible and deliverable. If a new school is required, then the land and the necessary contributions to help to deliver the school will be sought. If a new school is not required, then developer contributions will be sought to extend or add temporary classrooms to local schools. 9.56 Land for a primary school is reserved until such time as Hampshire County Council confirms in writing that there is either sufficient existing school capacity to meet the future needs of the development, or that existing schools are capable of expansion to provide the additional capacity needed. If a new school is not required, the school reserve site can be released for additional residential development.

Open space

9.57 Provision of formal public open space at west Marchwood should include provision of two adult football pitches and cricket pitch with supporting accommodation on site.

Allotments

9.58 Marchwood Parish Council has identified a local need for allotments. Allotments are in principle an acceptable use in the countryside outside settlement boundaries. Provision of allotments could be enabled by the development of Sites SS2 and/or SS3 Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.59 The Flood Risk Assessment will be required to show how improved flood and drainage management in the locality will ensure that there is no increased flood risk on or off the site. Port of Southampton

9.60 Development should take into account that the Port of Southampton is an established use that operates 24 hours a day, and is likely to expand its operations in the future.

The solar array area

9.61 The solar array operator has a lease extending beyond the Plan period. Should this lease be surrendered early, around 300 additional homes may be possible in the Plan period. Site masterplanning at planning application stage should set out how the solar array area would be integrated in the future to create an agreed comprehensive development framework, including how and where habitat mitigation and public open space would be provided for its future residents.

Nutrient management

9.62 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water International Nature Conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 2: Land south of Bury Road, Marchwood [3.77MB]

Strategic Site 3: Land at Cork's Farm, Marchwood

i. Land at Cork's Farm, Marchwood, as shown on the Policies Map is allocated is allocated for residential development of at least 150 homes and public open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to deliver a high quality new residential area of Marchwood by:

a. Providing a well-designed development that responds positively to the waterside location and provides protection from future sea level rise whilst also ensuring that the scale, form, siting and materials of the development conserve and enhance the heritage and setting of the Royal Naval Armaments Depot Conservation Area, including its listed buildings and walls.

b. Enabling public access through the site to the waterfront.

c. Creating a strong settlement edge with a clear distinction between formally designed streets, courtyards and spaces and natural recreational greenspace.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Design or other appropriate measures to mitigate potential odour impacts from Slowhill Copse Wastewater Treatment Works. An odour assessment will be required in consultation with Southern Water.

b. Assessment of the need for, and where necessary, provision of, enhancements to Bury Road, Marchwood Road and their connection to the A326 to ensure safe and suitable vehicular, cycle and pedestrian access for the development.

c. Design or other appropriate measures in any new development to minimise and mitigate the effects of potential noise and light impacts generated by the Port of Southampton on residential amenities.

d. Maintaining appropriate development setbacks from the pipelines and overhead powerlines that cross the site. e. Wherever possible, development should be directed to Flood Zone 1 and will only be considered within Flood Zones 2 or 3 where it is possible to mitigate flood risk. Preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment will be required to demonstrate how the proposed development will be made safe over its lifetime.

Supporting text

9.63 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.64 The development layout set out in the Concept Master Plan includes the required setbacks for a major gas pipeline running along the southern site boundary, and for electricity pylons crossing the site.

9.65 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site include:

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • A capacity appraisal of the sewage network and enhancements to sewer capacity if required, which will need to match the rate of development Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.66 Mitigation measures such as ground-raising and other flood defence works to address future flood risks must be undertaken in a manner that does not exacerbate risks to other developments or interests in the vicinity, and seeks to address the future vulnerability of adjoining developed areas from flooding that might otherwise arise or flow through site SS3 under the higher climate change flood risk scenarios. It will need to be demonstrated that any mitigation measures proposed to make the development safe for its lifetime can be funded through the development scheme.

Minerals

9.67 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area and some parts are also within a Minerals Safeguarding Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents, minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development.

Allotments

9.68 Marchwood Parish Council has identified a local need for allotments. Allotments are in principle an acceptable use in the countryside outside settlement boundaries. Provision of allotments could be enabled by the development of Sites SS2 and/or SS3.

Nutrient management

9.69 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water International Nature Conservation sites.

Port of Southampton

9.70 Development should take into account that the Port of Southampton is an established use that operates 24 hours a day, and is likely to expand its operation in the future.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 3: Land at Cork's Farm, Marchwood [3.41MB]

Strategic Site 4: The former Fawley Power Station

i.  The site of the former Fawley Power Station will be comprehensively redeveloped for residential-led mixed use scheme and public open space and will comprise the following:

  • Around 1,380 new homes dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided, but predominantly apartments, within the central and southern parts of the site.
  • Up to around 10,000 square metres of ancillary community, retail, leisure and service uses appropriate to serve a village-scale community, site-based activities and employees.
  • Office uses and a marina may be included within primarily residential areas in the central and southern parts of the site, subject to demand and viability.
  • Around 10 hectares of land in the northern part of the site for business and industrial uses (Use Classes B1 an B2) with a low environmental impact. Locations where sea access would be provided by the redevelopment to be prioritised for marine industries that require sea access, unless there is a demonstrable lack of demand.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a mixed-use waterside community embodying the highest standards of design and sustainability that also benefits the wider Calshot community by:

a.  Creating a landmark and contextually appropriate design that befits the prominent and sensitive location, concentrating areas of greater height and mass around the footprint of the current power station building, scaling down in height and density towards the water front and the southern site.

b. Providing public access to the waterfront and dockside areas including public spaces.

c. Providing a mix of commercial and community uses to enable a significant level of self-containment in facilities and employment opportunities.

d. Integrating planting and design features that maximise the wildlife and habitat potential of buildings and the development area, and to avoid, or where necessary manage and minimise, the impacts of development on the Solent foreshore and other areas of habitat value.

iii.     Site-specific Considerationsto be addressed include:

a.  The outputs of the SFRA Level 2 will be considered in the preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment demonstrating how the proposed development will be made safe over its lifetime.

b.  Toassess the need for, and to provide where necessary, enhancements to the B3053 and A326 where necessary to provide safe vehicular, public transport, cycle and pedestrian access for the development.

c.  Uses proposed especially in the northern quarter must be compatible with the extent of safety hazard from the Fawley oil refinery complex.

d. The need to incorporate and facilitate appropriate measures to ensure the conservation and enhancement of the landscape and scenic beauty of the neighbouring New Forest National Park.

e.  To ensure redevelopment is brought forward in a coordinated manner and fully mitigates its impacts, the promoter will prepare a master plan and supporting technical assessments for the entire Fawley Power Station site, for submission as part of the planning application. Development will be phased as set out in an approved master plan agreed with the local planning authorities.

Supporting text

9.71  Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.72 The site of the former Fawley Power Station will be developed as part of a comprehensive scheme which includes adjoining land allocated in Policy SP26 of the New Forest National Park Local Plan 2016-2036(2019). Policy SP26 supports the effective use of the previously developed power station site. Proposals include additional homes, land for a primary school if required and other measures that support a comprehensive redevelopment approach including the provision of extensive areas of natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation, restoration or enhancement, and the provision of other public open space.

9.73 The allocation site is also suitable for stand-alone redevelopment with a proportionate reduction in development capacity to accommodate sufficient public open space and natural recreational greenspace on-site.

9.74 This policy should be read in conjunction with the Infrastructure Delivery Plan, which lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows:

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Site-specific bird surveys will be required to confirm their contribution to in- combination loss of supporting habitat to internationally designated species and to be mitigated as required
  • Capacity for wastewater discharges to Ashlett Creek Sewage Treatment Works will require investigation
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation

Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.75 The mitigation measures such as ground raising and other flood defence works to address future flood risks must be undertaken in a manner that does not exacerbate risks to other developments in the vicinity. It will need to be demonstrated that any mitigation measures proposed to make the development safe for its lifetime can be funded through the development scheme. The site is within Flood Zone 3 but redevelopment is acceptable in principle on the basis that the site is a major regeneration opportunity on previously developed land.

Housing choice

9.76  The nature of the development offers an opportunity to provide purpose-built homes for rent.

Viability of development

9.77 An initial viability assessment has shown that the site can achieve the 35% affordable housing requirement applicable for residential development in the Totton and Waterside area, and to make appropriate provision for community needs.

9.78 It is not a requirement of this policy to build an extension to the existing dock or to provide a marina. Marina development is acceptable in principle provided that it forms part of a comprehensive, residential-led redevelopment, and does not compromise the viability of development to the extent that the site is unable to provide for a mixed community that meaningfully contributes to meeting local housing needs.

Minerals

9.79 Redevelopment of the site offers an opportunity for aggregates recycling to reduce the need to import building materials or land fill.

Nutrient management

9.80  Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water International Nature Conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 4: The former Fawley Power Station [2.62MB]

Strategic Site 5: Land at Milford Road, Lymington

i.  Land at Milford Road, Lymington as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 185 homes and public open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to:

a.  Plan development including the design of recreational greenspace  to define a new rural edge and enhanced boundary to the Green Belt, and to soften the transition between the development and the open countryside.

b.  Retain tree belts and enhance the water course on the eastern boundary as landscape features softening visual impacts and providing some green amenity space buffer to existing residential areas.

c.  Integrate the site into the built-up area of Lymington and Pennington connecting to its footpath networks.

iii. Site-specific Considerationsto be addressed include:

a.  Design or other appropriate measures to mitigate potential noise and odour impacts from Efford waste and recycling centre and Pennington Sewage Treatment Works.

b.  Measures to manage watercourse flood risks south of Milford Road along the eastern perimeter and in the south west corner of the site, as part of an integrated site approach to sustainable urban drainage.

Supporting text

9.81 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.82 The site can accommodate about 45 homes to the north of Milford Road, and about 140 homes to the south of Milford Road.

9.83 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows.

  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Site-specific bird surveys will be required to confirm their contribution to in- combination loss of supporting habitat to internationally designated species and to be mitigated as required

Minerals

9.84 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area and some parts (primarily south of Milford Road) are also within a Minerals Safeguarding Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents, minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development.

Nutrient management

9.85 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water International Nature Conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 5: Land at Milford Road, Lymington [2.96MB]

Strategic Site 6: Land to the east of Lower Pennington Lane, Lymington

i. Land to the east of Lower Pennington Lane, Lymington as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for at least 100 homes and public open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to:

a. Create a well-designed extension to the settlement of Lymington with a character and density that is respectful of the low density and rural edge character of the locality and surrounding properties.

b. Provide a central greenspace serving as a focal point for the development that also defines a new rural edge and softens the transition to the open countryside of the adjoining New Forest National Park.

c.  Retain and enhance important tree belts, rights of way, hedge rows and incidental open spaces around the site boundaries as landscape features forming an important part of the character of the site and providing some screening for existing residential areas.

d.  Integrate the site into the built-up area of Lymington connecting to its footpath networks to central Lymington, Woodside Park and to the countryside.

e.  Provide points of vehicular access to the site from both Lower Pennington Lane and from Ridgeway Lane, connecting to provide a vehicular route through the site.

iii.  Site-specific Considerationsto be addressed include:

a. The southern site boundary is the edge of the New Forest National Park, and the proposed site access at the south east corner is within the National Park.

b. Development and access arrangements must respect the tranquillity, privacy and security of the Oakhaven hospice.

c. Provision of additional visitor car parking for the hospice.

d. Maintaining the public right-of-way across the site as a dedicated footpath.

Supporting text

9.86 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.87 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the impacts of the development on the local infrastructure and services. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows.

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary, to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Site-specific bird surveys will be required to confirm their contribution to in- combination loss of supporting habitat to internationally designated species and to be mitigated as required.

Access

9.88  Vehicular access to the site is by rural lanes with a distinctive character requiring a careful balance between providing safe access and maintaining their character. Visibility and safety will need to be addressed for the site access onto Ridgeway Lane. The main pedestrian access towards the town centre should be provided via Woodside Lane and Forest Gardens.

Minerals

9.89 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents, incidental minerals extraction for re-use on-site may be appropriate as part of the development.

Oakhaven Hospice

9.90 Development should be carried out in a manner that respects the tranquillity, privacy and security of the Oakhaven hospice, for example by inclusion of landscape buffers or equivalent arrangements.

Nutrient management

9.91  Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water International Nature Conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 6: Land to the east of Lower Pennington Lane, Lymington [1.37MB]

Strategic Site 7: Land north of Manor Road, Milford on Sea

i. Land to the north of Manor Road, Milford-on-Sea as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 110 new homes and public open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a well-designed extension to the village that:

a. Respects and reinforces the strong rural character of Manor Road and Barnes Lane, protecting road margins and creating frontages of similar character along these lanes.

b. Retains boundary tree, hedge and embankment lines and integrates them into a walkable network of recreational greenspace connected to existing footpaths and to the countryside.

c. Creates a compact pattern of perimeter blocks, well-designed buildings and intimate streets with enough garden space internally and along frontages to create a sylvan setting characteristic of the local area.

d. Creates a strong and permanent Green Belt boundary to the north of the current glasshouses, with new development facing onto a main area of accessible natural recreational greenspace to be provided on Green Belt land within the site boundary.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Retention of service access to the telecommunications mast unless the mast is relocated.

b. Vehicular access to the site is to be provided from Manor Road. Barnes Lane is only suitable for emergency access.

Supporting text

9.92 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.93 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows.

  • Developer Contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application 
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • A capacity appraisal of the sewage network and enhancements to sewer capacity if required, which will need to match the rate of development

Green Belt

9.94 Land north of the east-west track from Barnes Lane to the telecommunications mast within the site boundary is Green Belt and not suitable for built development.

Minerals

9.95 The site is partly within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents, incidental minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development, for re-use on-site.

Nutrient management

9.96 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water International Nature Conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 7: Land north of Manor Road, Milford on Sea [1.0MB]

Strategic Site 8: Land at Hordle Lane, Hordle

i. Land at Hordle Lane, central Hordle as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 160 homes and public open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a sympathetic village development whilst maintaining a clear visual separation between the two halves of Hordle by:

a. Enhancing land along the stream and tree belt that forms the western boundary of the site (designated Green Belt and outside the settlement boundary) as a natural recreational greenspace area and wildlife corridor, incorporating sustainable drainage measures to manage water course flood risks and surface water run-off.

b. Provision of a north-south pedestrian access through the site, including from Stopples Lane connecting to Everton Road and Strategic Site 9: Land east of Everton Road via the public right of way at the northern site boundary.

c. Orientating development in the northern half of the site towards the main recreational greenspace with access from Hordle Lane, providing opportunities for pockets of higher density development within a village setting.

d. Protecting and enhancing the rural character of Hordle and Vicarage Lanes through the location of open greenspace, appropriate access and crossing points as well as additional hedgerow and tree planting.

e. Providing homes with gardens at a density appropriate to the rural settlement edge in the southern area of the site, with primary access off Hordle Lane and secondary access from Vicarage Lane.

f. Define a high quality rural and Green Belt edge to the village along Sky End Lane to soften the transition to open countryside designated as Green Belt.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Badger setts on the western site perimeter require appropriate development setbacks and habitat enhancement measures.

b. The stream and woodland belt in the north west of the site will require remedial and restorative works.

Supporting text

9.97 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.98 The site allocation boundary includes some existing residential properties that have not been promoted for redevelopment. There is no presumption or requirement that they would form part of a future development, but this would be acceptable in principle subject to meeting the requirements of this policy, and any policies relevant to the property itself e.g. if it has heritage asset status.

9.99 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows.

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of application
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation

Restrictive covenant

9.100 A covenant currently in place prevents built development on land between Hordle Lane and Vicarage Lane, accordingly shown as recreational greenspace on the Site Concept Master Plan. If the covenant is discharged or varied by agreement alternative layouts with the main area of recreational mitigation closer to the village edge would be supported.

Allotments

9.101 Hordle Parish Council has identified a local need for allotments in addition to provision being made off Hordle Lane. Allotments are in principle an acceptable use in the countryside outside settlement boundaries and in the Green Belt. Provision of allotments could be enabled by the development of Sites SS8 and/or SS9.

Settlement boundary

9.102 The development will define and make permanently open a pedestrian and greenspace corridor between the eastern and western parts of Hordle village which remains Green Belt, along the stream on the western edge of the site connecting to the right of way to Everton Road.

Minerals

9.103 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents and site ecology, incidental minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development, for re-use on- site.

Nutrient management

9.104 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water International Nature Conservation sites

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 8: Land at Hordle Lane, Hordle [1.94MB]

Strategic Site 9: Land east of Everton Road, Hordle

i. Land to the east of Everton Road, north Hordle as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 100 homes depending on the housing mix provided, and open space.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a development that redefines the green gap between the lower and upper parts of the village comprising:

a. A connected network of small development parcels set within existing field boundaries, retaining tree belts, streams and hedgerows.

b. An area of enhanced natural recreational greenspace on the eastern part of the site (within land designated as Green Belt outside the settlement boundary), defining a strong Green Belt boundary and green gap between the two parts of Hordle village, including new woodland trees and hedgerows to provide a habitat link between woodland to the south and north of the site.

c. Footpaths connecting through the site and linking to Strategic Site 8: Land at Hordle Lane to the south.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Providing a pedestrian crossing point on Everton Road to link the footpath/cycleway routes.

b. Principal vehicular access from Everton Road, with a secondary access from Silver Street.

c. Providing a well-defined edge and enhanced rural character to the Green Belt.

Supporting text

9.105 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.106 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows.

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application 
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation

Settlement boundary

9.107 The development will define and make permanently open a pedestrian and greenspace corridor between the eastern and western parts of Hordle village which remains Green Belt.

Allotments

9.108 Hordle Parish Council has identified a local need for allotments in addition to provision being made off Hordle Lane. Allotments are in principle an acceptable use in the countryside outside settlement boundaries and in the Green Belt. Provision of allotments could be enabled by the development of Sites SS8 and/or SS9.

Minerals

9.109 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents and site trees and ecology, incidental minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development, for re-use on-site.

Nutrient management

9.110 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water international nature conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 9: Land east of Everton Road, Hordle [2.19MB]

Strategic Site 10: Land to the east of Brockhills Lane, New Milton

i. Land to the east of Brockhills Lane, New Milton as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 130 new homes and public open space dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to provide a new rural edge neighbourhood to New Milton by:

a. Creating a compact pattern of well-designed buildings and streets with enough garden space internally and along frontages to create a sylvan setting comparable to the characteristics of the low density development in the area.

b. Providing vehicular access from Brockhills Lane and assess whether there is a need for improvements to the Brockhills Lane and Sway Road junction, and providing pedestrian crossing points across Sway Road and Brockhills Lane to link to existing footpaths.

c. Providing a central north-south greenspace corridor connecting to Sway Road as an internal focal point for the development, with the main area of natural recreational greenspace on the southern and eastern boundaries, buffering adjoining woodlands and the Danes Stream.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Ensuring the form and character of development layout relates appropriately to the New Forest National Park to the east and north.

b. Respecting the ecological sensitivity of the ancient woodland and other woodland habitat to the south and west of the site.

c. Managing flood risks from Danes Stream and its tributary in an ecologically sensitive manner, integrating sustainable drainage measures around existing water courses and the greenspace framework for the site.

Supporting text

9.111 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.112 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows.

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Access from Brockhills Lane via a three arm priority junction
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation

Open space

9.113 There is an identified need for additional football pitch provision and a multi-use games area (MUGA) in New Milton.

Minerals

9.114 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents and site ecology, minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development.

Nutrient management

9.115 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water international nature conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 10: Land to the east of Brockhills Lane, New Milton [3.09MB]

Strategic Site 11: Land to the south of Gore Road, New Milton

i. Land to the south of Gore Road, New Milton as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 160 new homes and public open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a well-designed new area of the town by:

a. Providing a positive frontage to Gore Road whilst retaining the better trees in the current frontage tree belt, maintaining a green gap between the development and the listed barn at former Gore Farm.

b. Creating a central greenspace within the development around which higher suburban densities can be accommodated, and arranging buildings on the southern and eastern frontages to face onto and provide natural surveillance to greenspace areas.

c. Concentrating open space provision on the southern and eastern edges of the development to complement and enhance existing public open space.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Design measures to manage the relationship between the development and the glasshouse structures and business operations of the adjacent nursery.

b. Respecting the setting of the listed building of barn at former Gore Farm. c. Enhancing access to Fawcett's Field recreation ground.

Supporting text

9.116 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.117 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows.

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation 
  • A capacity appraisal of the sewage network and enhancements to sewer capacity if required, which will need to match the rate of development

9.118 As the site is well integrated within New Milton settlement a housing mix that includes a higher proportion of smaller homes, including entry level housing for rent or sale, may be acceptable subject to appropriate design and other policy requirements. This approach may enable additional homes to be accommodated.

Open space

9.119 The raised nursery reservoir could form part of the natural recreational greenspace for the site if it was re-designed in the form of a natural pond at ground level, which could then also form part of a sustainable urban drainage system to manage surface water.

9.120 There is an identified need for additional football pitch provision and a multi-use games area (MUGA) in New Milton.

Nutrient management

9.121 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve nitrogen neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the Solent and Southampton Water international nature conservation sites.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 11: Land to the south of Gore Road, New Milton [2.02MB]

Strategic Site 12: Land to the south of Derritt Lane, Bransgore

i. Land to the south of Derritt Lane, Bransgore as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 100 new homes and public open space dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a well-designed village extension that enables improved flood risk management and safer pedestrian access for the wider locality by:

a. Protecting the green and rural qualities of Derritt Lane, retaining the roadside trees in an enhanced margin of greenspace with natural surveillance provided by the design and orientation of the dwellings.

b. Creating a new village green at the eastern end of the site and a greenspace corridor along the southern and western site boundaries and incorporating sustainable urban drainage and improved water course and surface water management as an amenity and habitat enhancement.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Providing connections to Public Rights of Way adjoining the site.

b. The preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) will be required which should demonstrate that there will be no inappropriate development within Flood Zone 3b.

c. Provide additional sewer and pumping station capacity if required.

d. Providing a strong and permanent boundary to the Green Belt to the west and south of the site.

Supporting text

9.122 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.123 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows:

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application 
  • A capacity appraisal of the sewage network and enhancements to sewer or pumping station capacity if required, which will need to match the rate of development
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Site-specific bird surveys will be required to confirm their contribution to incombination loss of supporting habitat to internationally designated species and to be mitigated as required

Open space

9.124 The village green at the eastern end can accommodate public open space suitable for formal or semi-formal sports uses.

Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.125 The Flood Risk Assessment should be informed by the outputs of the SFRA Level 2 and Climate Change requirements (February 2016) to ensure development is safe and that there is no increase in flood risk elsewhere over the lifetime of the development. Where, exceptionally, a reduction in flood storage or conveyance in areas outside of Flood Zone 3b is proposed, it would need to be fully compensated for on a level-for level/appropriate basis and supported with detailed hydraulic modelling for a development of this scale.

9.126 SuDs should include measures to reduce the run-off of silt and diffuse pollutants into the River Avon.

Minerals

9.127 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents, minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 12: Land to the south of Derritt Lane, Bransgore [6.07MB]

Icon for pdf Ringwood Strategic Site Allocations overview [2.88MB]

Strategic Site 13: Land at Moortown Lane, Ringwood

i. Land to the north of Moortown Lane, Ringwood, as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential-led development and will comprise the following:

  • At least 480 new homes and public open space dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.
  • Retention of about two hectares of allocated employment land adjoining Crow Arch Lane Industrial Estate in the north west corner of the site.
  • Provision of land for a minimum of 15 full size allotment plots within the site in order to provide for local needs arising from the development and in the wider community.

ii. Land in the Green Belt to the south of Moortown Lane, Ringwood as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for the following supporting uses to enable allocated land north of Moortown Lane to deliver the minimum number of homes required:

  • The provision of natural recreational greenspace and public open space (including outdoor sports facilities).
  • Two hectares of land to be reserved for a primary school.

iii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a well-designed and integrated southern extension of Ringwood by:

a. Providing natural greenspace corridors that connect the new residential areas to the town and to the countryside, linking the greenspace provision to the north of Crow Arch Lane with the recreational greenspace and playing fields area south of Moortown Lane.

b. Providing a hierarchy of connected streets that enable the throughmovement of local traffic between the B3347 Christchurch Road and Crow Lane, including a vehicular connection through Forest Gate Business Park to link though to the town centre area, and a new northeastern access point from Crow Lane towards the A31.

c. Providing a community focal point in a prominent location including ground floor premises suitable for community use.

d. Integrating sustainable drainage features to manage water course and surface water flood risks in the eastern part of the site

e. Enhancing the character of Moortown Lane with public open space provision and planting so that Moortown Lane is a strongly defined new Green Belt and settlement edge.

iv. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. The preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) will be required which should demonstrate that there will be no inappropriate development within Flood Zone 3b.

b. Provision of a new connection to the Ringwood Sewage Treatment Works with sufficient capacity to serve this site and to also serve and provide a point of connection for Strategic Site 14: Land to the north of Hightown Road.

c. Assess the need for enhancements to the Moortown Lane junctions with the B3347 Christchurch Road and with Crow Lane, and where necessary, to other parts of the local highways, pedestrian and cycle network.

Supporting text

9.128 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.129 The site allocation boundary includes some existing residential properties that have not been promoted for redevelopment. There is no presumption or requirement that they would form part of a future development, but this would be acceptable in principle subject to meeting the requirements of this policy, and any policies relevant to the property itself e.g. if it has heritage asset status.

9.130 Parts of the site are within 400m of the Avon Valley Natura 2000 Site and Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and the site is within the impact risk zone for the SSSI.

Infrastructure

9.131 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in Sconjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows:

  • A dedicated off-site connecting sewer or pumped connection to Ringwood Sewage Treatment Works
  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application. Unless confirmed in writing to be unnecessary by Hampshire County Council, two hectares of land will be reserved on-site for a new primary school in a location that is conveniently walkable from both the development and the adjacent settlement
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Improvements to the Christchurch Road and Moortown Lane junction
  • Measures or contributions to achieve phosphorus neutral development
  • Site-specific bird surveys will be required to confirm their contribution to incombination loss of supporting habitat to internationally designated species and to be mitigated as required

Schools

9.132 Based on a capacity of 480 homes, Hampshire County Council preference is for extensions to existing primary schools rather than provision of a new school, subject to technical confirmation that expansion is feasible and deliverable. If a new school is required, then the land and the necessary contributions to help to deliver the school will be sought. If a new school is not required, then developer contributions will be sought to extend or add temporary classrooms at Ringwood Infant and Junior Schools or Poulner Infant and Junior Schools.

9.133 If a new school is not required, the school reserve site will remain public open space within the Green Belt.

Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.134 The Flood Risk Assessment should be informed by the outputs of the SFRA Level 2 and Climate Change requirements (February 2016) to ensure development is safe and that there is no increase in flood risk elsewhere over the lifetime of the development. Where, exceptionally, a reduction in flood storage or conveyance in areas outside of Flood Zone 3b is proposed, it would need to be fully compensated for on a level-for-level / appropriate basis and supported with detailed hydraulic modelling for a development of this scale.

Nutrient management

9.135 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve phosphate neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the River Avon Special Area of Conservation. SuDs should include measures to reduce the run-off of silt and diffuse pollutants into the River Avon.

Minerals

9.136 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents, minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 13: Land at Moortown Lane, Ringwood [5.94MB]

Strategic Site 14: Land to the north of Hightown Road, Ringwood

i. Land to the north of Hightown Road, Ringwood, as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential-led mixed use development and will comprise the following:

  • Residential development of at least 270 new homes and public open space dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided
  • Around three hectares of employment land

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a new area of Ringwood with a countryside edge that has regard to and respects the landscape sensitivities of the adjoining New Forest National Park by:

a. Creating a transition of character from suburban town to rural edge reducing the intensity of development towards the rising land in the east, incorporating a significant area of recreational greenspace along the New Forest National Park boundary; and through the orientation of wedges of greenspace and broad streets in an east-west alignment.

b. Creating a north-south greenspace along the site's western boundary, providing flood attenuation and drainage features as part of a high quality landscape.

c. Creating a new site access spur from the A31 slipway (Southampton Road) roundabout to a main north-south street serving as both the focal point for development and an alternative route for local traffic to the A338 Christchurch Road in conjunction with Strategic Site 13: Land at Moortown Lane.

d. Providing a community focal point in a prominent location including ground floor premises suitable for community use.

e. Incorporating employment and small business uses on the northern edge of the site with embankments and tree planting to buffer traffic impacts from the A31.

ii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Wherever possible, development should be directed to Flood Zone 1 and will only be considered within Flood Zones 2 or 3 where it is possible to mitigate flood risk. Preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) demonstrating how the proposed development will be made safe over its lifetime will be required.

b. Provision of a new connection to the Ringwood Sewage Treatment Works bypassing the town centre sewer network, to be delivered in conjunction with Strategic Site 13: Land at Moortown Lane.

c. Ensuring that new development preserves the setting of the listed building, the Elm Tree public house.

Supporting text

9.137 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.138 The site allocation boundary includes some existing residential properties that have not been promoted for redevelopment. There is no presumption or requirement that they would form part of a future development, but this would be acceptable in principle subject to meeting the requirements of this policy, and any policies relevant to the property itself e.g. if it has heritage asset status.

9.139 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows:

  • A dedicated off-site connecting sewer or pumped connection to Ringwood Sewage Treatment Works
  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Southampton Road and A31-conversion roundabout upgrading
  • Measures or contributions to achieve phosphorus neutral development

Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.140 The SFRA prepared for the Local Plan included 'Level Two' Flood Risk Assessment of land at north of Hightown Road, parts of which are in Flood Risk Zones 2 and 3 and which is at higher risk of groundwater emergence. The SFRA confirmed in general terms that safe development could be achieved. The Flood Risk Assessment will be required to show how improved flood and drainage management in the locality will ensure that there is no increased flood risk on or off the site. It will need to be demonstrated that any mitigation measures proposed to make the development safe for its lifetime can be funded through the development scheme.

Nutrient management

9.141 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve phosphate neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the River Avon Special Area of Conservation. SuDs should include measures to reduce the run-off of silt and diffuse pollutants into the River Avon.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 14: Land to the north of Hightown Road, Ringwood [2.06MB]

Strategic Site 15: Land at Snails Lane, Ringwood.

i. Land at Snails Lane, Ringwood, as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 100 new homes and open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create an attractive new rural edge neighbourhood by:

a. Protecting the rural character of the gravel lanes by accessing the site at the western end via Snails Lane.

b. Retaining and enhancing the hedgerow frontage to Snails Lane and providing a frontage along Snails Lane that reflects the existing development pattern.

c. Creating a north-south footpath and open space link through the site.

d. Create a broad area of green recreational space along the southern margin of the site with footpaths connecting at strategic points to the existing public rights of way.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Providing safe pedestrian access to the public footpath along Salisbury Road, and from the site to Poulner Infant and Junior School.

b. The preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) will be required which should demonstrate that there will be no inappropriate development within Flood Zone 3b.

Supporting text

9.142 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.143 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows:

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Measures or contributions to achieve phosphorus neutral development 
  • Site-specific bird surveys will be required to confirm their contribution to incombination loss of supporting habitat to internationally designated species and to be mitigated as required.

Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.144 The Flood Risk Assessment should be informed by the outputs of the SFRA Level 2 and Climate Change requirements (February 2016) to ensure development is safe and that there is no increase in flood risk elsewhere over the lifetime of the development. Where, exceptionally, a reduction in flood storage or conveyance in areas outside Flood Zone 3b is proposed, it would need to be fully compensated for on a level-for-level / appropriate basis and supported with detailed hydraulic modelling for a development of this scale.

Nutrient management

9.145 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve phosphate neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the River Avon Special Area of Conservation. SuDs should include measures to reduce the run-off of silt and diffuse pollutants into the River Avon.

Drainage and wastewater

9.146 The development will need to provide a connection to the nearest point of adequate capacity in the sewerage network, as advised by the service provider, and/or to work cooperatively with the service provider to deliver a suitable sewer connection to the nearest wastewater treatment works with adequate capacity.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 15: Land at Snails Lane, Ringwood [2.49MB]

Icon for pdf Fordingbridge Strategic Site Allocations Overview [2.8MB]

Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road, Ashford

i. Land to the north of Station Road, Ashford as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 140 homes and public open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided.

ii. The masterplanning objective for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a well-designed new neighbourhood that:

a. Provides a valley corridor of natural recreational greenspace and habitat connecting to lower Station Road and, via the former railway public footpath and Marl Lane, to Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road and to Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate to form part of a linked network of green infrastructure around Fordingbridge, maintaining Ashford and Fordingbridge as distinct settlements.

b. Provides most of the new homes on the higher ground on the western side of the site with two points of vehicular access to the site from Station Road and a pedestrian/cycle access only from Ashford Close.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. The developers of Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road, Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road, and Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate will be required to work cooperatively with each other and with Wessex Water to deliver a suitable foul sewer connection to the Fordingbridge treatment works.

b. Provision on the northern part of the site of land and facilities suitable for formal recreation.

c. The loss of healthy specimen trees to accommodate development or provide access should be minimised.

d. The preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) will be required which should demonstrate that there will be no inappropriate development within Flood Zone 3b.

Supporting text

9.147 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.148 The site allocation boundary includes a residential care home that has not been promoted for redevelopment.

9.149 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows:

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Sewer connections and enhanced sewer capacity
  • Measures or contributions to achieve phosphorus neutral development

Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.150 The Flood Risk Assessment should be informed by the outputs of the SFRA Level 2 and Climate Change requirements (February 2016) to ensure development is safe and that there is no increase in flood risk elsewhere over the lifetime of the development. Where, exceptionally, a reduction in flood storage or conveyance in areas outside Flood Zone 3b is proposed, it would need to be fully compensated for on a level-for-level / appropriate basis and supported with detailed hydraulic modelling for a development of this scale.

Sewer capacity and wastewater treatment

9.151 The developers of Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road, Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road, and Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate will need to work cooperatively with each other and with the water company to proportionately fund and cooperatively deliver a suitable foul sewer connection to the Fordingbridge treatment works, and the phased delivery of additional wastewater treatment capacity. Sewer provision through Site SS16 must be of sufficient capacity to accommodate, and provide a suitable point of connection for, wastewater arising from Sites SS17 and SS18 without the imposition of a 'ransom strip' to future connections.

Open space

9.152 There is a need for formal open space within the wider Fordingbridge area: two multi-use games areas (MUGA), and an adult and a youth football pitch. The site promoters will need to work together to achieve a suitable overall formal open space framework, and all Fordingbridge area sites will contribute to proportionately address their combined formal open space needs.

9.153 The northern part of Site SS16 is a suitable location for play and informal sport pitch provision and/or a MUGA as part of the public open space requirement.

Nutrient management

9.154 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve phosphate neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the River Avon Special Area of Conservation. SuDs should include measures to reduce the run-off silt and diffuse pollutants into the River Avon. Settlement boundary

9.155 The precise location of the eastern Ashford settlement boundary will be agreed through the planning application process, in a position that retains a clear open space and landscape gap in the valley between the development and to the west of Marl Lane. Minerals

9.156 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents, incidental minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road, Ashford [5.4MB]

Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road, Fordingbridge

i. Land at Whitsbury Road, Fordingbridge as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential development of at least 330 homes and open space dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided, in addition to the 145 homes already permitted within the site boundary.

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to create a well-designed new neighbourhood of Fordingbridge securing the protection and management of the Sweatford green corridor and helping to deliver enhanced flood management for the wider town by:

a. Protecting and enhancing the landscape and ecological value of the woodlands, wetlands and watercourse features that make up a central belt of green infrastructure through the site, centred around Sweatford Water and the woodland tree groups west of the stream and along the former railway line.

b. Integrating the management of fluvial, surface and groundwater flood risk for all development at Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road and to Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate, into the design and management of landscape and greenspace.

c. Providing three distinctive neighbourhoods in terms of setting, sense of place and character with a gradual transition to lower densities and detached properties along rural edges including Puddleslosh Lane and Marl Lane:

  • Enhancing Tinkers Cross as an identifiable hamlet accessed off Whitsbury Road and close to the top of Puddleslosh Lane.
  • A new rural edge neighbourhood between Sweatfords Water and Puddleslosh Lane.
  • The land east of Whitsbury Road as a suburban neighbourhood focused on a corridor of high quality streets and linked spaces.
  • Provision of footpath adjacent to former railway line east of Whitsbury Road92. d. Creating two main access points as a roundabout on Whitsbury Road, offering a new access for local traffic towards the A338 (via development at Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate) and providing a sympathetically designed bridge to provide the primary access to land west of Sweatfords Water.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include

a. The developers of Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road, Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road, and Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate will be required to work cooperatively with each other and with Wessex Water to deliver a suitable foul sewer connection to the Fordingbridge treatment works.

b. Access to the site will be from a roundabout on Whitsbury Road, with access to the south west side from a bridge crossing Sweatfords Water.

c. Contributions towards the provision of formal open space on Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road and/or Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate.

d. The loss of healthy specimen trees to accommodate development or provide access should be minimised.

e. The preparation of a detailed site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) will be required which should demonstrate that there will be no inappropriate development within Flood Zone 3b.

Supporting text

9.157 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.158 The site allocation boundary includes some existing residential properties that have not been individually promoted for redevelopment. There is no presumption or requirement that they would form part of a future development, but this would be acceptable in principle subject to meeting the requirements of this policy.

9.159 The site will deliver at least 330 homes in addition to the 145 homes already permitted within the site boundary. This will comprise of around 60 further homes east of Sweatford Water, and around 270 homes west of Sweatford Water. Development should generally be one and two storey dwellings, with more intensive or higher development only where it defines key spaces and streets within the development.

9.160 The relocation or replacement of the existing employment uses on Whitsbury Road to land within Site SS18 Land at Burgate closer to the A338 would be supported, subject to appropriate measures to secure the delivery of the replacement employment premises.

Infrastructure

9.161 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site are as follows:

  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Sewer connections and enhanced sewer capacity
  • Measures or contributions to achieve phosphorus neutral development Flood Risk Assessment (FRA)

9.162 The Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) should be informed by the outputs of the SFRA Level 2 and the latest Climate Change requirements to ensure development is safe and that there is no increase in flood risk elsewhere over the lifetime of the development. Where, exceptionally, a reduction in flood storage or conveyance in areas outside of Flood Zone 3b is proposed, it would need to be fully compensated for on a level-for-level / appropriate basis and supported with detailed hydraulic modelling for a development of this scale.

Sewers and wastewater treatment

9.163 The developers of Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road, Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road, and Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate will need to work cooperatively with each other and with the water company to proportionately fund and cooperatively deliver a suitable foul sewer connection to the Fordingbridge treatment works, and the phased delivery of additional wastewater treatment capacity. Sewer provision through Site SS17 must be of sufficient capacity to accommodate, and provide a suitable point of connection for, wastewater arising from all parts of Site SS18 without the imposition of a 'ransom strip' to future connections.

Open space

9.164 There is a need for formal open space within the wider Fordingbridge area: two multi-use games areas, and an adult and a youth football pitch. The site promoters will need to work together to achieve a suitable overall formal open space framework. All Fordingbridge area sites will contribute land and/or funding contributions to proportionately address their combined formal open space needs.

9.165 The site will also need to comply with Saved Policy FORD 2.7 of the Local Plan Part 2 (2014), which requires the provision of a footpath adjacent to former railway line east of Whitsbury Road. 

Nutrient management

9.166 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve phosphate neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the River Avon Special Area of Conservation. SuDs should include measures to reduce the run-off silt and diffuse pollutants into the River Avon.

Minerals

9.167 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents and areas of ecological sensitivity, incidental minerals extraction for re-use on-site may be appropriate as part of the development.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road, Fordingbridge [5.76MB]

Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate, Fordingbridge

i. Land at Burgate, Fordingbridge, as shown on the Policies Map is allocated for residential-led mixed use development and open space comprising:

  • Residential development of at least 400 homes and public open space, dependent on the form, size and mix of housing provided
  • A community focal point including ground floor premises suitable for community use to the west of Lower Burgate, and local shopping and service facilities subject to market demand
  • Retention of existing employment and service uses, and additional employment provision near to the A338 subject to demand

ii. The masterplanning objectives for the site as illustrated in the Concept Master Plan are to provide a well-designed extension to Fordingbridge that minimises its impacts upon the countryside and the wider landscape setting of the town and provides enhanced flood risk management for the wider town, by:

a. Creating a distinctive landscape and townscape that respects the characteristics of the Avon Valley landscape and maintains the distinctive rural and historic character of Upper Burgate and Fryern Court.

b. Providing a comprehensive ground and surface water management system for the site, benefiting the town as a whole including a central north-south corridor of management of fluvial, surface and groundwater flood risk into the landscape.

c. Creating at least two access points onto the A338 to serve the development, with internal connections for local traffic through the site to Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road.

d. Focussing new neighbourhoods upon a central corridor of streets and spaces connecting Whitsbury Road to the A338 Salisbury Road, providing opportunities to accommodate some higher density development.

e. Providing a community focal point in a prominent location near the schools including ground floor premises suitable for community use, linking to or as part of a mixed-use opportunity area in Lower Burgate.

f. Redefining the rural edge by providing naturally managed areas of recreational mitigation space along the northern and western parts of the site, and locating predominantly low-rise dwellings at lower densities close to these margins, maintaining the separate identity of Upper Burgate and Tinkers Cross.

g. Provide pedestrian and cycle links between the new residential areas, the community focal point and the schools.

iii. Site-specific Considerations to be addressed include:

a. Conserving and enhancing the setting of the listed buildings in Upper and Lower Burgate.

b. No part of the development is to be directly accessed by car from Fryern Court Road.

c. Retain the Grade II listed Lower Burgate Farmhouse within the development area to provide an appropriate setting so that its significance can be appreciated.

d. The developers of Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road, Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road, and Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate will be required to work cooperatively with each other and with Wessex Water to deliver a suitable foul sewer connection to the Fordingbridge treatment works.

Supporting text

9.168 Site capacity and housing mix will be tested in detail at the planning application stage.

9.169 The site allocation boundary includes some existing residential properties that have not been promoted for redevelopment. There is no presumption or requirement that they would form part of a future development, but this would be acceptable in principle subject to meeting the requirements of this policy, and any policies relevant to the property itself e.g. if it has heritage asset status.

9.170 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan should be read in conjunction with this policy as it lists the requirements that will be needed to mitigate the development's impacts on the local infrastructure. The main infrastructure requirements for the site include: • Provision of a new road access and junction to the A338 in Upper Burgate

  • Measures to manage surface and groundwater flood risks, without increasing downstream risks and if possible reducing them
  • Sewer connections and enhanced sewer capacity
  • A football pitch and a multi-use games area
  • Provision and in-perpetuity maintenance of public open space and
  • Natural recreational greenspace for habitat mitigation
  • Developer contributions to access, or to provide, school capacity where necessary to meet the educational needs of the development, in a manner and location to be agreed with Hampshire County Council at the point of planning application
  • Measures or contributions to achieve phosphorus neutral development

Village core and mixed use opportunity area

9.171 The policy requires that existing business and service uses be retained. The site concept master plan identifies a mixed use opportunity area where these are currently located, and where there is an opportunity for additional provision of local business and services uses subject to demand, alongside residential development. This area is near to local schools and to a potential 'village' focal point, but is also an area of transition between land interests requiring an integrated and cooperative design approach to create a successful village core area that is framed by surrounding development.

Surface and groundwater flood risks and run-off nutrient management

9.172 In periods of heavy rainfall and when groundwater levels are high the site is prone to surface water flooding including from groundwater sources nearby that are usually dry. The site will need to be made safe from likely future flood risks in a manner that stores and slows the passage of flood water to help protect areas downstream towards central Fordingbridge, utilising sustainable urban drainage techniques integrated into public open space and natural recreational greenspace areas.

9.173 Preparation of a development-specific nutrient budget and nutrient management strategy will be required to demonstrate how the development will achieve phosphate neutrality in relation to wastewater discharge and drainage run-off, to avoid the potential for adverse impacts on the River Avon Special Area of Conservation. SuDs should include measures to reduce the run-off of silt and diffuse pollutants into the River Avon.

Sewer and wastewater treatment

9.174 The developers of Strategic Site 16: Land to the north of Station Road, Strategic Site 17: Land at Whitsbury Road, and Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate will need to work cooperatively with each other and with the water company to proportionately fund and cooperatively deliver a suitable foul sewer connection to the Fordingbridge treatment works, and the phased delivery of additional wastewater treatment capacity. Sewer provision through Sites SS16 and SS17 must be of sufficient capacity to accommodate, and provide a suitable point of connection for, wastewater arising from all parts of Site SS18 without the imposition of a 'ransom strip' approach to future connections.

Open space

9.175 All development sites in the Fordingbridge area will contribute land and/or funding contributions to proportionately address their combined formal open space needs. The site provides a suitable location for play and formal or informal sport pitch provision as part of the public open space requirement for the site. The site could include formal open space provision to address needs from other developments in the area that are less suitable for on-site provision of formal public open space.

Settlement boundary

9.176 The precise location of the northern settlement boundary will be agreed through the planning application process, in a position that retains a clear open space and landscape gap between the development, Burgate Cross and Fryern Court Road.

Minerals

9.177 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area. Subject to confirmation of the scale and quality of the resource, potential impact on groundwater and safeguarding the amenity of nearby residents, minerals extraction may be appropriate as part of the development.

Icon for pdf Strategic Site 18: Land at Burgate, Fordingbridge [4.25MB]

Appendix A: Saved Policies

A.1  n determining planning applications the Council will apply the reviewed policies of the Local Plan 2016-2036 Part One, together with any policies saved from previous Local Plans and the policies of any adopted Neighbourhood Plans, and where applicable the Hampshire Minerals and Waste Plan.

A.2 This appendix sets out:

A.3 Where a Saved Policy includes a cross-reference to a previous policy that has not been saved, refer instead to its replacement policy in this Local Plan Part One. If there is no replacement policy, that section of the Saved Policy will not be applied.

A.4 Other Local Plan and national policy and guidance will continue to be taken into account where they are relevant.

Icon for pdf Policies of the New Forest District Local Plan First Alteration (2005) [6.34MB]

Policy

New Forest District Local Plan First Alteration Policy title

Status

Local Plan 2016

- 2036

Review outcome

DW-E12

Protection of landscape features (saved from the Local Plan 2005)

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

Icon for pdf Policies of the Core Strategy (2009) [871.56KB]

Policy

Core Strategy Policy title

Status

Local Plan

2016-2036

Review outcome

CS1

Sustainable Development

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy STR1

CS2

Design quality

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy ENV3

CS3

Protecting and enhancing our special environment (Heritage and Nature Conservation)

Deleted

Policy Deleted

Covered by Saved Policies DM1, DM2 DW-E12 plus Policies ENV3, ENV4

CS4

Energy and resource use

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy IMPL2

CS5

Safe and healthy communities

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy CCC1

CS6

Flood risk

Replaced

Part 1

Rely on NPPF

CS7

Open spaces, sport and recreation

Saved

Part 1

Saved

CS8

Community services and infrastructure

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy STR8

CS9

Settlement hierarchy

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy STR4

CS10

The spatial strategy

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policies STR1-9

CS11

New housing land allocations

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policies STR5, SS1-SS18

CS12

Possible additional housing development to meet a local housing need

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policies STR5, SS1-SS18

CS13

Housing types, sizes and tenure

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy HOU1

CS14

Affordable housing provision

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy HOU2

CS15

Affordable housing contribution requirements from developments

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy HOU2

CS16

Gypsies, travellers and travelling showpeople

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy HOU4

CS17

Employment and economic development

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policies STR6, ECON1 and ECON2

CS18

New provision for industrial and office development and related uses

ReplacedPart 1Replaced by Policy STR6
CS19TourismSavedPart 1Saved
CS20Town, district, village and local centresReplacedPart 1Replaced by Policy ECON5
CS21Rural economySavedPart 1Saved
CS22Affordable housing for rural communitiesReplacedPart 1Replaced by Policy HOU5
CS23Transport proposalsReplacedPart 1Replaced by Policy STR7
CS24Transport considerationsReplacedPart 1Replaced by Policy CCC2
CS25Developers' contributionsReplacedPart 1Replaced by Policy IMPL1

Policies of the Local Plan Part Two (2014)

Policy

Local Plan Part 2 Policy title

Status

Local Plan

2016-2036

Review outcome

NPPF1

Presumption in favour of sustainable development

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

DM1

Heritage and Conservation

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM2

Nature conservation, biodiversity and geodiversity

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM3

Mitigation of impacts on European nature conservation sites

Replaced

Part 1

Replace by Policy ENV1

DM4

Renewable and Low Carbon energy generation

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM5

Contaminated Land

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM6

Coastal Change Management area

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM7

Restrictions on new soakaways

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM8

Protection of public open space

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM9

Green Infrastructure linkages

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM10

Residential accommodation for older people

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy HOU3

DM11

Marine related businesses

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM12

Access to the water

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM13

Tourism and visitor facilities

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM14

Primary Shopping frontages

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy ECON6

DM15

Secondary shopping frontages

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy ECON6

DM16

Outside primary and secondary frontages

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM17

Local Shopping frontages, Totton, etc

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy ECON6

DM18

Local Shopping frontages, Marchwood, etc

Replaced

Part 1

Replaced by Policy ECON6

DM19

Small shops and pubs

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM20

Residential development in the countryside

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM21

Agricultural or forestry workers dwellings

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM22

Employment in the countryside

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM23

Shops, services and community facilities in the countryside

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM24

Loss of rural employment sites etc

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM25

Recreational uses in the countryside

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DM26

Development generating significant freight movement

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

DW-E12

Protection of landscape features (saved from the 2005 Local Plan)

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

Totton and Eling

TOT1

Land at Durley Farm

Saved

Part 2

Review in LP Part 2

TOT2

Land at Loperwood Farm

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

TOT3

Land at Hanger Farm

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT4

Land off Oleander Drive

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

TOT5

Land north of Michigan Way

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

TOT6

Land east of Brokenford Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT7

Stocklands, Calmore Drive

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

TOT8

Land off Blackwater Drive

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

TOT9

Bus Depot Salisbury Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT10

Land at Little Testwood Farm caravan site

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT11

Eling Wharf

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT12

Land at Little Testwood Farm

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT13

Land at Sunnyfields Farm

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT14

Industrial Estate west of Brokenford Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT15

Totton town centre opportunity sites

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT16

Civic building complex

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT17

Environmental and transport improvements

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT18

Rumbridge Street secondary shopping frontage

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT19

New Public open space north east of Bartley Park

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT20

Extension to Public open space south of Bartley Park

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT21

Land for allotments, Jacobs Gutter Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT22.1

Totton Western by-pass (A326): A35 Michigan Way junction to Cocklydown Lane junction, junction improvement

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT22.2

Rumbridge Street to A336 /Ringwood Road (via Brokenford Lane) cycle route

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

TOT22.3Dales Way to Stonechat Drive cycle routeSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.4Testwood Lane to Salisbury Road (via Library road) cycle/pedestrian routeSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.5

Bartley Park to Brokenford Lane (via Bartley Water) cycle route

SavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.6

Hamtun Gardens to Testwood Lane (via Greenfields Avenue) cycle route

SavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.7Jacobs Gutter Lane (west) to Hounsdown Business Park: on road and off road cycle route linking through Durley Farm site, connecting to A35 and A326SavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.8Jacobs Gutter Lane to Downs Park Crescent (Hounsdown to Eling) cycle routeSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.9Jacobs Gutter Lane (east of A326 spur) cycle routeSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.10Water Lane/Westfield Car Park : Pedestrian link between car park/rear service area and eastern end of Water LaneSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.11Footpath improvements/cycle route linking to existing cycle routes and paths in West Totton, Green route (extended) to Tatchbury LaneSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
TOT22.12Footpath /cycleway route linking green route at Hanger Farm Arts Centre to Spruce DriveSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2

Marchwood

MAR1

Land Between Cracknore Hard Lane and Normandy Way

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MAR2

Land at Parks Farm

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

MAR3

Land south of Hythe Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MAR4

Land off Mulberry Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MAR5

Marchwood Industrial Park

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MAR6

Cracknore Industrial Park

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MAR7

Marchwood Military Port

Updated

Part 1

Replaced by Policy ECON3

MAR8.1

Bury Road to Main Road (via Reed Drive and Cranberry Close) on and off road cycle route through the village centre

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MAR8.2

Marchwood Road / Bury Road (from Tavell's Lane junction) - adjacent to road cycle route link to Totton cycle network

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

Hythe and Dibden

HYD1

Land at Forest Lodge Farm

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

HYD2

Land off Cabot Drive

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HYD3

Land between Jones Lane and Southampton Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HYD4

Hythe Town Centre opportunity sites

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HYD5

Car park extensions

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HYD6

New POS south of Hardley Lane, west of Fawley Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HYD7

New POS west of Lower Mullins Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HYD8.1

Pier Head bus/ferry interchange improvements and pedestrian link between the Pier Head and the Promenade

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

HYD8.2

Cycle route linking Applemore to National Cycle Network

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

HYD8.3

North road to Dibden local centre cycle route

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

HYD8.4

Cycle route connecting New Road to South Street

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HYD8.5

Cycle route connecting South Street to Wild Ground Schools

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HYD8.6

Public right of way Footpath No.10 - Reconstruct footway connecting Hythe to Marchwood

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

Blackfield

BLA1

Land adjacent to Blackfield Primary School

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

Fawley

FAW1

Fawley oil refinery

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

Hardley

    

HAR1

Land adjoining Hardley Industrial Estate

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

Lymington and Pennington

LYM1

Pinetops Nurseries

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM2

Land north of Alexandra Road

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM3

Land at Queen Katherine Road

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM4

Land south of Ampress Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

LYM5

Fox Pond Dairy Depot and Garage

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

LYM6

Riverside Site, Bridge Road

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM7

Ampress Park

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

LYM8

Town Centre Opportunity sites

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

LYM9

Burgage Plots

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

LYM10.1

Pennington to Highfield via Priestlands Road and the Bunny run cycle route

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM10.2

Marsh Lane to Ampress Park cycle route

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM10.3

Pennington Square/South Street to Pound Road cycle route

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM10.4

Provision of footpath (0.15km) linking Highfields Avenue to Priestlands Lane

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM10.5

Footway improvements along High Street and St Thomas Street to enhance walking route through the town centre

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

LYM10.6

Improve connections along Bath Road, between The Quay and the Sea Wall path

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

LYM10.7

Provision of footpath around the Riverside site (LYM16) including railway crossing

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

Milford-on-Sea

MoS1

Land north of School Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MoS2.1

Milford on Sea to Downton via Blackbush Road Cycle route

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MoS2.2

Milford Primary School/Lymington Road to Keyhaven Road via Lyndale Close and Carrington Lane cycle route

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

MoS2.3

Provision on measures to address vehicle/ pedestrian conflicts in Carrington Lane. Where opportunities arise, this will include provision of a footway on the east side of Carrington Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

Hordle and Everton

HOR1

Land to the rear of 155-169 Everton Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HOR2

Land at Hordle Lane Nursery

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

HOR3.1

New Milton to Hordle on and off road cycle route between Lower Ashley Road and Stopples Lane via Hare Lane, Lavender Road and Heath Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HOR3.2

Bus stop improvement near WI Hall, Ashley Lane, Hordle

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

HOR3.3

Footpath link from Footpath no. 738 to Stopples Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HOR3.4

Improvements at Everton Road crossroad junction with Hordle Lane and Woodcock Lane

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

HOR3.5

Sight line improvements at Everton Road junction with Frys Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

HOR3.6

Footway improvements along Woodcock Lane up to Sheldrake Gardens from the junction with Everton Road

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

HOR3.7

Milford Road (A337)/Lymington Road (B3058) traffic lights

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

New Milton and Barton on Sea

NMT1

Land south of Gore Road

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

NMT2

Land west of Moore Close

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT3

Land off Park Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT4

Land east of Caird Avenue - housing site

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT5

Land east of Caird Avenue - business and employment

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT6

Land east of Caird Avenue - south of Carrick Way

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT7

Land east of Fernhill Lane

Deleted

Policy Deleted

 

NMT8

Ashley Cross Garage

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT9

Land west if Caird Avenue

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT10

Town centre opportunity sites

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT11

NMT 11 New POS west of Fernhill Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT12

New POS south of Lymington Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

NMT143Land for AllotmentsSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.1Station Road/Manor Road/avenue Road junction improvements including junction realignmentSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.2A337 to Ashley Road via Caird Avenue superstore cycle routeSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.3Chatsworth Way- Gore Road: Cycleway linking the industrial estate to residential area to the north of the railway lineSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.4Old Milton to Gore Road via Church Lane and Milton Mead cycle routeDeletedPolicy Deleted 
NMT14.5

New Lane (NPA boundary) to Gore Road, on road and off road cycle route along Stem Lane

SavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.6Town Centre to Walkford along Gore Road Industrial Estate (including Elm Avenue) shared cycle/pedestrian useSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.7Gore Road to Marley Avenue cycle route across bridge to Davis FieldSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.8Footpath from Caird Avenue to Lower Ashley Road linking to Carrick Way, Wentwood Gardens and Glen SpeySavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.9Station Road/Albert Road footpath improvements along railway embankmentSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
NMT14.10Provision of a footpath (0.8km) linking Dark Lane to Fernhill Lane residential area to west of sports facilitiesSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2

Ringwood

RING1

Land East of Christchurch Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

RING2

Land south of Castleman Way

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

RING3

Land south of Ringwood

Saved in part

Part 1

Policy SS13

replaces RING3 for land south of Crow Arch Lane

RING4

Town Centre Opportunity sites

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

RING5

New public open space, land west of Green Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

RING6.1

Cycle route along Kingsfield to Southampton Rd via Manor Rd, Green Lane, Parsonage Barn Lane (dismount section on pedestrian bridge over A31) and Winston Way

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

RING6.2

School Lane to Cloughs Road - on road cycle route via Manor Road with short off road section adjacent to the schools

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

RING6.3

Crow Arch Lane to Moortown Lane - cycleway

across fields to Moortown Lane

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

RING6.4Cycle route - Castleman Way to Crow Lane via Embankment WaySavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
RING6.5Castleman Way to town centre via Quomp and The Close on road cycle route with off road section through Victoria Gardens open spaceDeletedPolicy Deleted 
RING6.6

Cycle route from Mansfield Road to Southampton Road via Carvers Sports Ground

Under ConstructionPolicy Deleted 
RING6.7Moortown to Castleman Way via New Street - cycle route on and adjacent roadUnder ConstructionPolicy Deleted 
RING6.8Southampton Road enhanced pedestrian environment to make the area safe and attractive for walking and cycling, southern section to Fridays CrossSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
RING6.9Moortown to town centre via Quomp, improvements to existing paths and footways including footway link through the employment allocation east of Christchurch RoadUnder ConstructionPolicy Deleted 
RING6.10Southampton Road, west of Frampton Place, footpath widening to provide shared pedestrian/cycle routes

Saved

Part 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
RING6.11Extension of footpath alongside Bickerley Road to create a continuation to Danny Cracknell Pocket ParkSavedPart 2 or NDPReview in LP Part 2
RING6.12Improve facilities for pedestrians to encourage greater footfall in this part of the shopping area whilst maintaining vehicle access for shopping and servicingDeletedPolicy Deleted 

Fordingbridge

FORD1

Land east of Whitsbury Road

Saved

Part 1

Replacced by Policy SS17

FORD2.1

Marl Lane to Station Road, Ashford on and off road cycle route via Falconwood Close

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

FORD2.2

Penny's Lane to Marl Lane crossing Whitsbury Road via Charnwood Drive and Avon Meade and along former railway line

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

FORD2.3

Cycle route - Ashford to Normandy Way along Station Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

FORD2.4

Recreation Ground to Bickton Mill via U119 cycle route (0.6km) across rural open land with an on road section linking to the town centre

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

FORD2.5

Avon Meade to Green Lane: on road and off road cycle route

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

FORD2.6

Improved footpath route from Flaxfields End (off Station Road)

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

FORD2.7

Provision of footpath adjacent to former railway line east of Whitsbury Road

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

Ashford

ASH1

Land adjoining Jubilee Crescent

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

Sandleheath

SAND1

Land west of the Scout Centre

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

SAND2

Sandleheath Industrial Estate

Saved

Part 2 or NDP

Review in LP Part 2

 

Appendix B: Glossary

Adopted Policies Map: A map of the Local Planning Authority's area which must be reproduced from, or based on, an Ordnance Survey map; include an explanation of any symbol or notation which it uses; and illustrate geographically the application of the policies in the adopted development plan. Where the adopted Policies Map consists of text and maps, the text prevails if the map and text conflict.

Adoption: Formal approval by the Council of a Development Plan Document or Supplementary Planning Document whereupon it achieves its full weight in making planning decisions

Affordable Housing: As defined in the National Planning Policy Framework glossary, currently (2020): 'Housing for sale or rent, for those whose needs are not met by the market (including housing that provides a subsidised route to home ownership and/or is for essential local workers)'. The NPPF defines a number of affordable housing formats/ tenures.

Air Quality Management Areas (AQMA): Areas designated by local authorities because they are not likely to achieve national air quality objectives by the relevant deadlines.

Annual Monitoring Report (AMR): Assesses and reports on the progress of the Adopted Local Plan and other planning policy documents. In doing so, it monitors how successfully the policies of the plan are being implemented.

Back-up grazing/back-up land: Enclosed pasture land which forms an integral part of the commoning economy. Generally it is located close to a commoner's holding. Its uses include overwintering of stock, raising store cattle, making hay or silage, tending sick animals and young stock, finishing ponies for riding, and preparing stock for market.

Brownfield land: See Previously developed land

Business Incubator: Is a workspace created to offer start-ups and new ventures access to the resources they need, all under one roof. In addition to a desk or office, incubators often provide resident companies with access to expert advisors, mentors, administrative support, office equipment, training, and/or potential investors.

Clean Air Zone: A Clean Air Zone defines an area where targeted action is taken to improve air quality and resources are prioritised and coordinated in order to shape the urban environment in a way that delivers improved health benefits and supports economic growth. They aim to address all sources of pollution, including nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter, and reduce public exposure to them using a range of measures tailored to the particular location.

Coastal Change Management Area (CCMA): An area identified in Local Plans as likely to be affected by coastal change (physical change to the shoreline through erosion, coastal landslip, permanent inundation or coastal accretion).

Commoners of the New Forest: Those people eligible to use rights of common. In the New Forest this is based on the occupation of specific land to which common rights are attached. Practising commoners are those who exercise their rights and pay marking fees to the Verderers.

Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL): A levy allowing local authorities to raise funds from owners or developers of land undertaking new building projects in their area.

Community Right to Build Order: An Order made by the local planning authority (under the Town and Country Planning Act 1990) that grants planning permission for a site-specific development proposal or classes of development.

Designated heritage asset: A World Heritage Site, Scheduled Monument, Listed Building, Protected Wreck Site, Registered Park and Garden, Registered Battlefield or Conservation Area designated under the relevant legislation.

Edge of centre: For retail purposes, a location that is well connected and up to 300 metres of the primary shopping area. For all other main town centre uses, a location within 300 metres of a town centre boundary. For office development, this includes locations outside the town centre but within 500 metres of a public transport interchange. In determining whether a site falls within the definition of edge of centre, account should be taken of local circumstances.

Environmental Net Gain: This encompasses net gains to the wider natural environment including biodiversity, together with landscape quality, design quality and local distinctiveness. It is an approach to development that leaves the natural environment in a measurably better state than it was beforehand. Subsequently published national requirements for achieving biodiversity net gain will, where relevant, need to be addressed as a part of the Local Plan approach to achieving environmental net gains.

European site: This includes candidate Special Areas of Conservation, Sites of Community Importance, Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protection Areas, and is defined in regulation 8 of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010.

Five Year Housing Land Supply: The National Planning Policy Framework1 requires Local Planning Authorities to identify and update annually a supply of specific deliverable sites sufficient to provide five years' worth of housing against their housing requirements with an additional buffer of 5% or 20% (moved forward from later in the Plan period) to ensure choice and competition in the market for land.

Flood Zone 1 (FZ1): Land having a less than 1 in 1,000 annual probability of river or sea flooding. This is the zone at lowest flood risk.

Flood Zone 2 (FZ2): Land having between a 1 in 100 and 1 in 1,000 annual probability of river flooding; or land having between a 1 in 200 and 1 in 1,000 annual probability of sea flooding.

Flood Zone 3a (FZ3a): Land having a 1 in 100 or greater annual probability of river flooding; or Land having a 1 in 200 or greater annual probability of sea flooding. This is the zone at the highest flood risk.

Flood Zone 3b (FZ3b): This zone comprises land where water has to flow or be stored in times of flood. Local Planning Authorities should identify in

Grampian condition: A "Grampian condition" is a planning condition attached to a decision notice that prevents the start of a development until off-site works have been completed on land not controlled by the applicant.

Green Belt: Policy to prevent urban sprawl around large urban areas by keeping the land permanently open. The Green Belt around the District is the South West Hampshire Green Belt.

Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA): Used to assess the impacts of proposals and land-use plans against the conservation objectives of a European Protected Site and to ascertain whether it would adversely affect the integrity of that site.

Heritage asset: A building, monument, site, place, area or landscape identified as having a degree of significance meriting consideration in planning decisions, because of its heritage interest. Heritage asset includes designated heritage assets and assets identified by the local planning authority (including local listing).

International, national and locally designated sites of importance for biodiversity: All international sites (Special Areas of Conservation, Special Protection Areas, and Ramsar sites), national sites (Sites of Special Scientific Interest) and locally designated sites including Local Wildlife Sites.

Knowledge-based and high value-added business activities: Water transport; Air transport; Motion picture, video and television programme production, sound recording and music publishing activities; Programming and broadcasting activities; Telecommunications; Computer programming, consultancy and related activities; Information service activities; Financial service activities, except insurance and pension funding; Insurance, reinsurance and pension funding, except compulsory social security; Activities auxiliary to financial services and insurance activities; Legal and accounting activities; Activities of head offices; management consultancy activities; Architectural and engineering activities, technical testing and analysis; Scientific research and development; Advertising and market research; Other professional, scientific and technical activities; Employment activities; Security and investigation activities.

Local Impact Report (LIR): An LIR is a report in writing giving details of the likely impact of the proposed development on the authority's area, or any part of that area. It can cover any topics considered relevant to the impact of the proposed development on the area. It should draw on existing local knowledge and experience. Examples might be local evidence of flooding, local social or economic issues or local knowledge of travel patterns to community facilities.

Local Transport Plan: A statutory document that looks at the transport needs of an area and sets out a strategy and implementation plan to deliver those needs in a sustainable way.

Minerals Consultation Area: A geographical area, based on a Mineral Safeguarding Area, where the District council should consult the Mineral Planning Authority for any proposals for non-minerals development.

Mineral Safeguarding Area: An area designated by Minerals Planning Authorities which covers known deposits of minerals which are desired to be kept safeguarded from unnecessary sterilisation by non-mineral development.

Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIP): Large scale developments (typically relating to energy, transport, water, or waste) which require a type of consent known as "development consent". The Planning Act 2008 introduced a new development consent process for NSIPs which was subsequently amended by the Localism Act 2011.

Neighbourhood plans: A plan prepared by a Parish Council or Neighbourhood Forum for a particular neighbourhood area (made under the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004).

Out of centre: A location which is not in or on the edge of a centre but not necessarily outside the urban area.

Out of town: A location out of centre that is outside the existing urban area.

Planning obligation: A legally enforceable obligation entered into under section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 to mitigate the impacts of a development proposal.

Precautionary principle: There is no universally accepted definition of the precautionary principle. The key point of the Principle is to create an impetus to take a decision notwithstanding scientific uncertainty about the nature and extent of the risk, i.e. to avoid 'paralysis by analysis' by removing excuses for inaction on the grounds of scientific uncertainty. Although the precautionary principle was originally framed in the context of preventing environmental harm, it is now widely accepted as applying broadly where there is threat of harm to human, animal or plant health, as well as in situations where there is a threat of environmental damage.

Previously developed land (PDL): Land which is or was occupied by a permanent structure, including the curtilage of the developed land (although it should not be assumed that the whole of the curtilage should be developed) and any associated fixed surface infrastructure. This excludes: land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestry buildings; land that has been developed for minerals extraction or waste disposal by landfill purposes where provision for restoration has been made through development control procedures; land in built-up areas such as private residential gardens, parks, recreation grounds and allotments; and land that was previously-developed but where the remains of the permanent structure or fixed surface structure have blended into the landscape in the process of time. Also known as 'brownfield land'.

Primary shopping area: Defined area where retail development is concentrated (generally comprising the primary and those secondary frontages which are adjoining and closely related to the primary shopping frontage).

Primary and secondary frontages: Primary frontages are likely to include a high proportion of retail uses which may include food, drinks, clothing and household goods. Secondary frontages provide greater opportunities for a diversity of uses such as restaurants, cinemas and businesses.

Priority habitats and species: Species and Habitats of Principle Importance included in the England Biodiversity List published by the Secretary of State under section 41 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006.

Ramsar sites: Wetlands of international importance, designated under the 1971 Ramsar Convention.

Section 106 agreements (S106): This refers to the benefits or safeguards, often for community benefit, secured by way of a legally binding agreement between the local planning authority and a developer as part of a planning approval. These are usually provided at the developer's expense; for example, affordable housing, community facilities or mitigation measures.

Section 278 agreements (S278): A section 278 agreement is a section of the Highways Act 1980 that allows developers to enter into a legal agreement with the council to make alterations or improvements to a public highway, as part of a planning application.

Site of Importance for Nature Conservation (SINC): Non-statutory sites of local importance for nature conservation, identified by county councils and wildlife trusts and given some level of protection by local planning policies.

Special Areas of Conservation: Areas given special protection under the European Union's Habitats Directive, which is transposed into UK law by the Habitats and Conservation of Species Regulations 2010.

Special Protection Areas (SPA): Areas which have been identified as being of international importance for the breeding, feeding, wintering or the migration of rare and vulnerable species of birds found within European Union countries. They are European designated sites, classified under the Birds Directive.

Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA): A Strategic Flood Risk Assessment is a study carried out by one or more local planning authorities to assess the risk to an area from flooding

Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA): An assessment of the land capacity across the District with the potential for housing.

Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA): A study of the way the housing market works in any particular area. It looks into the type of people living in the area, where they work and what sort of houses they need.

Sustainability Appraisal (SA): An assessment of the social, economic and environmental impacts of a plan. It usually includes a Strategic Environmental Assessment.

Sustainable Development: Meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS): Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) are designed to mimic the natural drainage of surface water, typically managing rainfall close to where it falls.

Town centre: Area defined on the local authority's proposal map, including the primary shopping area and areas predominantly occupied by main town centre uses within or adjacent to the primary shopping area. References to town centres or centres apply to city centres, town centres, district centres and local centres but exclude small parades of shops of purely neighbourhood significance. Unless they are identified as centres in Local Plans, existing out-of-centre developments, comprising or including main town centre uses, do not constitute town centres.

Transport assessment (TA): A comprehensive and systematic process that sets out transport issues relating to a proposed development. It identifies what measures will be required to improve accessibility and safety for all modes of travel, particularly for alternatives to the car such as walking, cycling and public transport and what measures will need to be taken to deal with the anticipated transport impacts of the development.

Travel plan: A long-term management strategy for an organisation or site that seeks to deliver sustainable transport objectives through action and is articulated in a document that is regularly reviewed.

Share this page

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by email

Print

Print this page